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The Assessment of the Efficacy of Different Therapies for Severe Head Injuries

  • B. Jennett
  • G. Teasdale
  • J. Frey
  • R. Braakman
  • J. Minderhoud
  • J. Heiden
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 28)

Abstract

Reviewing mortality over recent decades, Langfitt (1978) concluded that there had been little improvement in spite of the application of several measures designed to control the secondary events that threaten life after injury. Three explanations are possible. One is that therapy is ineffective. Another is that more efficient resuscitation and transportation enable more hopelessly injured patients to reach special centres, where they soon die; this maintains a high mortality rate-even though other patients are doing better than previously.

Keywords

Motor Response Secondary Event Special Centre Standardize System Severe Head Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

  1. 1.
    Jennett, B., Teasdale, G., Galbraith, S., Pickard, J., Grant, H., Braakman, R., Avezaat, C., Maas, A., Minderhoud, J., Vecht, C. J., Heiden, J., Small, R., Caton, W., Kurze, T., Severe head injuries in three countries. J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiat. 40 (1977), 291–298.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Jennett
    • 1
  • G. Teasdale
    • 1
  • J. Frey
    • 1
  • R. Braakman
    • 2
  • J. Minderhoud
    • 3
  • J. Heiden
    • 4
  1. 1.Departments of NeurosurgeryUniversity of GlasgowUK
  2. 2.Departments of NeurosurgeryUniversity of RotterdamNetherlands
  3. 3.Departments of NeurosurgeryUniversity of GroningenNetherlands
  4. 4.Departments of NeurosurgeryUniversity of Southern CaliforniaUSA

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