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Prognostic Value of the Intracranial Pressure Levels During the Acute Phase of Severe Head Injuries

  • R. D. Lobato
  • J. J. Rivas
  • J. M. Portillo
  • L. Velasco
  • F. Cordobes
  • J. Esparza
  • E. Lamas
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 28)

Abstract

Intracranial pressure (ICP) continuous monitoring after severe craniocerebral trauma seems to be a valuable technique in order to improve the therapeutic management of the patients5, 7, 10. Nevertheless its value in predicting the ultimate outcome of the individual patient remains controversial. Some authors have found a good correlation between ICP levels and outcome1, 7, 10, 11 while others deny this correlation2, 5, 6, 9. These discrepances may be explained in part by the heterogeneous clinicopathological groups of patients included in some series.

Keywords

Head Injury Intracranial Pressure Intracranial Hypertension Severe Head Injury Severe Brain Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. D. Lobato
    • 1
  • J. J. Rivas
    • 1
  • J. M. Portillo
    • 1
  • L. Velasco
    • 1
  • F. Cordobes
    • 1
  • J. Esparza
    • 1
  • E. Lamas
    • 1
  1. 1.Neurosurgical DepartmentC. S. “1° de Octobre”MadridSpain

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