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African Swine Fever Virus

  • W. R. Hess
Part of the Virology Monographs book series (VIROLOGY, volume 9)

Abstract

The causative agent of African swine fever (ASF) is an icosahedral virus 175 to 215 mv, in diameter. It is sensitive to lipid solvents and contains deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Thus far, it appears to have no close relatives among other viruses that infect mammals. It has apparently existed for a very long time in wild swine indigenous to Africa, for with them it has established an ideal host-parasite relationship in which prolonged infection occurs without signs of disease. In fact, the existence of the virus came to light only after domestic swine of European origin were brought into areas inhabited by wart hogs. Although the precise mode of transmission from wild swine is obscure, the virus spreads readily among domestic swine and produces a peracute disease with mortality approaching 100 per cent. Since the swine industry is quite sparse in such areas, the outbreaks are largely self-limiting. Each outbreak usually represents a new incursion of the virus from its natural reservoir. This continues to be the pattern of most outbreaks in Africa, and until recently the peracute infection which prevails under these conditions has been regarded as the usual form of the disease in domestic swine. However, ASF has spread to Europe and in some areas has become enzootic in domestic swine. In these areas, acute, subacute, and chronic infections are common and the mortality is somewhat reduced. Its resemblance to classical swine fever (American hog cholera and European swine fever) has become more pronounced, and differential diagnosis in the field is seldom possible.

Keywords

Classical Swine Fever African Swine Fever African Swine Fever Virus Frog Virus Domestic Swine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Wien 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. R. Hess
    • 1
  1. 1.Plum Island Animal Disease Laboratory, Animal Disease and Parasite Research DivisionAgricultural Research Service, United States Department of AgricultureGreenportUSA

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