Breathing Mechanics and Phonation

  • Donald F. Proctor


We have now devoted five chapters to a discussion of morphology and function, a discussion necessary to any depth of understanding of the human voice. Now we must go on to the application of that information to the problems of speech and song. In this chapter our purpose is to examine the modifications of the process of breathing necessary for normal sound production.


Lung Volume Vital Capacity Abdominal Muscle Elastic Force Single Tone 


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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald F. Proctor
    • 1
  1. 1.The Johns Hopkins Schools of Medicine and Hygiene and Public HealthBaltimoreUSA

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