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Inference and Information Resources: A design case study

  • R. E. Fields
  • N. A. Merriam
Conference paper
Part of the Eurographics book series (EUROGRAPH)

Abstract

Much attention has been paid in HCl to techniques for designing systems that conform to the tasks users wish to carry out. It is often the case that such approaches rely on identifying the combinations of commands a user will be expected to issue and information they will need to access, and designing an interface with appropriate temporal behaviour. Many fields of activity, however, are highly information intensive, and the way in which a human-machine cognitive system makes inferences and reasons and makes decisions is far more important than the way it carries out actions. In this paper, therefore, we explore an approach to design that places much more emphasis on the form and structure of a display than it’s temporal properties, and the role it plays in cognitive activity.

Keywords

Control Surface Hydraulics System External Representation Eurographics Workshop Fluid Quantity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. E. Fields
    • 1
  • N. A. Merriam
    • 1
  1. 1.Human-Computer Interaction Group, Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of YorkYorkUK

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