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The viability of modelling socially organised activity

  • J. C. McCarthy
Conference paper
Part of the Eurographics book series (EUROGRAPH)

Abstract

Research into socially organised activity provides insights which should not be ignored by interactive system designers. At the same time, the emergence of social context as a salient factor in the design and use of information technology poses problems for the activity of modelling in design. By highlighting the informal, tacit, contingent, and relational aspects of technology use, it raises issues which test the technical scope and practical value of model making. In this paper, attempts to use activity-based insights in design are reviewed and their implications for the relationship between model and activity are considered.

Keywords

Organise Activity Work Practice Requirement Analysis Cooperative Work Math Performance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. C. McCarthy
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied PsychologyUniversity College CorkIreland

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