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Decreased hippocampal metabolic rate in patients with SDAT assessed by positron emission tomography during olfactory memory task

  • M. S. Buchsbaum
  • C. Cotman
  • P. Kesslak
  • G. Lynch
  • H. Chui
  • J. Wu
  • N. Sicotte
  • E. Hazlett
Part of the Key Topics in Brain Research book series (KEYTOPICS)

Summary

Positron emission tomography with F-18 deoxyglucose was used to assess cortical metabolic rate during an olfactory memory task in six patients with senile dementia of the Alzheimer’s type and six healthy, age-matched controls. Decreases in metabolic rate were observed in the anterior portion of the medial temporal cortex, especially on the left in the patients. This region is known to receive a large olfactory input, and to have been implicated in the encoding of human memory. Our results are consistent with earlier reports of temporal lobe decreases in metabolic rate, extending them by examining areas salient to the behavioral loss.

Keywords

Positron Emission Tomography Metabolic Rate Temporal Lobe Glucose Metabolic Rate Medial Temporal Cortex 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. S. Buchsbaum
    • 1
  • C. Cotman
    • 2
  • P. Kesslak
    • 2
  • G. Lynch
    • 2
  • H. Chui
    • 2
  • J. Wu
    • 2
  • N. Sicotte
    • 2
  • E. Hazlett
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Human BehaviourUniversity of CaliforniaIrvineUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Human BehaviourUniversity of CaliforniaIrvineUSA

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