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Results of EEG brain mapping and neuroimaging methods in Senile Dementia of Alzheimer’s Typ (SDAT) and Vascular Dementia (VD)

  • H. Lechner
  • K. Niederkorn
  • Ch. Logar
  • R. Schmidt
  • F. Fazekas
  • S. Horner
  • H. Valetitsch
Part of the Key Topics in Brain Research book series (KEYTOPICS)

Summary

In order to determine the impact of neuroimaging methods and EEG brain mapping on the differential diagnosis of dementia 11 patients with SDAT and 11 patients with VD were studied. All SDAT patients scored 2 or less on the Rosen-Hackinski scale, the vascular dementia patients 4 or more. The Mini Mental and Mattis scale scores were similar. MRI showed cerebral infarcts in 82% of the VD group versus 0% in the SDAT group. Basal ganglia hyperinten­sities in early confluent and confluent white matter lesions occurred more fre­quently in the VD group SPECT revealed cortical minor perfusions mainly in patients with VD, diffuse frontal and diffuse parietal temporal cortical minor perfusions were detected exclusively in patients with SDAT. Duplex scanning of the carotid arteries showed no significant difference of the status of the extracra­nial carotid arteries between the 2 dementia groups.

EEG brain mapping clearly demonstrate the slowing down of the basis rhythm in the SDAT patients, the main advantage in comparison with routine EEG lies in the statistical possibilities of this method.

It could be shown that the use of neuroimaging methods and EEG brain mapping adds significantly to the capability of clinical scores to differentiate between degenerative and vascular etiology of dementia, improving the possibil­ities of treatment and prevention.

Keywords

Vascular Dementia Duplex Scanning Dementia Group Neuroimaging Method Basis Rhythm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Lechner
    • 1
  • K. Niederkorn
    • 2
  • Ch. Logar
    • 2
  • R. Schmidt
    • 2
  • F. Fazekas
    • 2
  • S. Horner
    • 2
  • H. Valetitsch
    • 2
  1. 1.Universitäts-NervenklinikGrazAustria
  2. 2.Universitäts-NervenklinikGrazAustria

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