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Sequential clinical approach to differential diagnosis of dementia

  • T. Wetterling
  • D. Rumpf-Höling
  • P. Vieregge
  • K.-J. Borgis
  • P. Delius
  • K.-H. Reger
  • R. Kanitz
  • H.-J. Freyberger
Part of the Key Topics in Brain Research book series (KEYTOPICS)

Summary

In this study an attempt is made to prove whether a sufficient differentiation can be obtained by the sequential application of some short scores [Blessed Dementia Scale, Mini Mental State Exam, Ischemic Score, and the Alzheimer Inventory (Cummings and Benson, 1986)1, CT scan, EEG and laboratory tests. The data of 76 patients admitted with the presumptive diagnosis of dementia are presented. 20.5% of the demented patients could be diagnosed to suffer from a possibly treatable cause.

Keywords

Demented Patient Hamilton Depression Scale Ischemic Score Nondemented Patient Hamilton Depression Scale Score 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Wetterling
    • 1
  • D. Rumpf-Höling
    • 2
  • P. Vieregge
    • 3
  • K.-J. Borgis
    • 4
  • P. Delius
    • 2
  • K.-H. Reger
    • 2
  • R. Kanitz
    • 2
  • H.-J. Freyberger
    • 2
  1. 1.Klinik für PsychiatrieMedizinische Universität zu LübeckLübeckFederal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Klinik für PsychiatrieMedizinische Universität zu LübeckLübeckFederal Republic of Germany
  3. 3.Klinik für NeurologieMedizinische Universität zu LübeckLübeckFederal Republic of Germany
  4. 4.Institut für RadiologieMedizinische Universität zu LübeckLübeckFederal Republic of Germany

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