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Convulsant properties of methylxanthines, potential cognitive enhancers in dementia syndromes

  • J. Deckert
  • P. F. Morgan
  • K. A. Jacobson
  • J. W. Daly
  • P. J. Marangos
Part of the Key Topics in Brain Research book series (KEYTOPICS)

Summary

One of the major side effects of the methylxanthines and adenosine receptor antagonists caffeine and theophylline is the provocation of seizures. With the availability of highly selective adenosine receptor antagonists it was of interest to investigate if they would also induce seizures. In experiments with mice it was found that also highly selective adenosine receptor antagonists like Xanthine Amine congener are able to induce seizures. The therapeutic usefulness of highly selective adenosine receptor antagonists as e.g. cognitive enhancers in dementia syndromes is thus limited by this serious side effect.

Keywords

Adenosine Receptor Cognitive Enhancer Adenosine Receptor Antagonist Dementia Syndrome Xanthine Xanthine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Deckert
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. F. Morgan
    • 2
  • K. A. Jacobson
    • 3
  • J. W. Daly
    • 3
  • P. J. Marangos
    • 2
  1. 1.Universitäts-NervenklinikWürzburgFederal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Unit on NeurochemistryNIMH, Biological Psychiatry BranchBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Laboratory of Biological ChemistryNIDDKBethesdaUSA

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