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Molecular and cellular changes associated with neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques

  • J-P. Brion
  • M. E. Cheetham
  • M. Coleman
  • G. Dale
  • J-M. Gallo
  • D. P. Hanger
  • A. Probst
  • D. C. Smith
  • B. H. Anderton
Part of the Key Topics in Brain Research book series (KEYTOPICS)

Summary

Immunocytochemical studies have shown that changes in amyloid processing and in proteoglycan core proteins occur in senile plaques. Western blotting studies have shown that an extra tau species is present in Alzheimer brain and tangle-reactive neurofilament antibodies were found to be more selective towards phosphorylated neurofilaments than those that do not recognise tangles. A fragment of MAP2 was found to be present in tangles.

Keywords

Down Syndrome Neurofibrillary Tangle Senile Plaque Paired Helical Filament Western Blotting Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • J-P. Brion
    • 1
  • M. E. Cheetham
    • 2
  • M. Coleman
    • 2
  • G. Dale
    • 2
  • J-M. Gallo
    • 2
  • D. P. Hanger
    • 2
  • A. Probst
    • 3
  • D. C. Smith
    • 2
  • B. H. Anderton
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratoire d’Anatomie Pathologique et de Microscopie Electronique, Faculté de MédecineUniversité Libre de BruxellesBruxellesBelgium
  2. 2.Department of ImmunologySt George’s Hospital Medical SchoolLondonUK
  3. 3.Institut für PathologieUniversität BaselBaselSwitzerland

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