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Abstract

Since organic chemistry began, the chemistry of natural products from terrestrial organisms such as plants and fungi has been studied intensively; in contrast, marine species have received relatively little attention. However, in the last decade research in the field of marine products has increased sbstantially. The heightened interest in this area is attested by the appearance of the monumental treatise of Halstead on Poisonous and Venomous Marine Animals in 1965 (108), Baslow’s review on “Marine Pharmacology” in 1969 (14) and Scheuer’s recent book “Chemistry of Marine Natural Products” (160) in 1973. In addition Premuzic’s review devoted to the Chemistry of Natural Products Derived from Marine Sources, was published in volume 29 of this series in 1971 (152).

Keywords

Natural Product Marine Sponge Furan Ring Tetrahedron Letter Total Sterol Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Minale
    • 1
  • G. Cimino
    • 1
  • S. De Stefano
    • 1
  • G. Sodano
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratorio per la Chimica di Molecole di Interesse Biologico del C. N. R.Arco Felice (Napoli)Italy

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