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Keywords

Absolute Configuration Platinum Catalyst Streptomyces Griseus Cyclohexane Ring Optical Rotatory Dispersion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abstract

The glutarimide antibiotics constitute a group of near-neutral naturally-occurring substances whose discovery was heralded in 1946 by the isolation of a substance, called actidione (later changed to cy cloheximide: vide infra) from a streptomycin-producing strain of Streptomvices griselts (129). Although this material displayed little or no activity against the usual pathogenic bacteria, it was found to be very effective in inhibiting the growth of many fungi. The characteristic feature of these antibiotics is the 3-ethylglutarimide group which is substituted at only the β-position of the ethyl group.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Johnson
    • 1
  1. 1.WaylandUSA

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