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Design and Applications of Sliding Bearings

  • M. C. Constantinou
Part of the CISM International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 345)

Abstract

The design of sliding isolation systems and relevant applications are presented. Sliding isolation systems which found application are:
  1. (1)

    EDF system consisting of leaded bronze-stainless steel sliding bearings without restoring force,

     
  2. (2)

    TASS system consisting of PTFE-elastomeric sliding bearings and rubber restoring force devices,

     
  3. (3)

    Spherical sliding or Friction Pendulum System (FPS),

     
  4. (4)

    Lubricated PTFE sliding bearings with additional energy dissipating devices, and

     
  5. (5)

    Sliding bearings with restoring force devices for bridge applications.

     

Keywords

Isolation System Shake Table Testing Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis Seismic Isolation Seismic Excitation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. C. Constantinou
    • 1
  1. 1.State University of New York at BuffaloBuffaloUSA

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