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Medical Applications

  • Guido Belforte
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 60)

Abstract

Fluidic elements can find a useful employment in the field of medical equipment for many important causes:
  1. 1)

    the equipment must have a great reliability and fluidic elements can guarantee it;

     
  2. 2)

    the equipment must be fast and response time short. The required working frequencies and response times may be well obtained by fluidic equipment;

     
  3. 3)

    many applications are relative to fluid, both gases (air, oxygen, gas mixtures) and liquids (blood, water, urine). In some cases it is necessary to measure pressure or temperature, and to identify different gases. These operations may be performed by use of fluidic techniques.

     

Keywords

Medical Application Fluidic Element Natural Heart Coanda Effect Bistable Switch 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guido Belforte
    • 1
  1. 1.Technical University of TurinItaly

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