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Sensitivity Analysis, Optimization and Inverse Problems

  • Tadeusz Burczyński
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 440)

Abstract

This chapter is devoted to the application of the boundary element method (BEM) to sensitivity analysis, optimization and inverse problems of solid mechanics. A few approaches of sensitivity analysis based on the boundary element formulation are presented. The influence of the geometry change in external or internal boundaries on displacements, stresses and natural frequencies and various kinds of functionals is presented. Applications of sensitivity analysis information and BEM to optimization for different optimality criteria and to defect identification are considered. Evolutionary computations based on boundary element models of structures are applied for various problems of topology and shape optimization. The optimization of elastic and thermoelastic structures and elastoplastic and cracked solids under static and dynamic loads is considered. Solutions of a class of inverse problems for identification of voids and cracks and searching optimal boundary conditions are presented. Several numerical examples and tests are included.

Keywords

Inverse Problem Boundary Element Topology Optimization Boundary Element Method Shape Optimization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tadeusz Burczyński
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department for Strength of Materials and Computational MechanicsSilesian University of TechnologyPoland
  2. 2.Institute of Computer ModellingCracow University of TechnologyPoland

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