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Effective Knowledge Elicitation

  • P. W. H. Chung
Conference paper
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 333)

Abstract

The construction of a knowledge-based system is an attempt to embody the knowledge of a particular expert, or experts, within a computer program. The knowledge used in solving problems must be elicited from the expert so that it can be acquired by the system. It has long been recognised that the elicitation of knowledge from the experts is a potential bottleneck in the construction of knowledge-based systems. This paper discusses some of the proven knowledge elicitation techniques and provides practical guidelines on how to apply them effectively. The techniques are described in the context of a single knowledge engineer acquiring knowledge from a single expert. This is the arrangement that most workers recommend; issues relating to multiple experts and multiple engineers are discussed in the final section.

Keywords

Expert System Knowledge Acquisition Knowledge Engineer Card Sort Rutherford Appleton Laboratory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. W. H. Chung
    • 1
  1. 1.Loughborough University of TechnologyLoughboroughUK

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