Advertisement

Biomechanical power analysis in Nordic and alpine skiing

  • Ansgar Schwirtz
  • Daniel Hahn
  • Andreas Huber
  • Anke Neubert
  • Ferdinand Tusker
Conference paper
Part of the CISM Courses and Lectures book series (CISM, volume 473)

Abstract

The aim of the biomechanical power analysis is to control the training process. In Nordic and alpine skiing the factors power and jumping force are very important. Therefore maximum isometric strength and different jump performances will be tested. By testing the athletes over several years longitudinal analysis make it possible to compare the mean values of performance parameters from athletes between 14 and 19 years of age. This was done for cross country skiing, ski jumping and alpine skiing. Furthermore specific requirements like strength endurance will be checked with special tests like performing 35 squad jumps in 70 seconds to see the rate of lactate increase. The latest advancement is to analyse fast contractions at high velocity movements. To realize this future trend, three-dimensional analysis of external and internal loads must be done. In addition we are in need of a powerful diagnostic machine that allows high velocities for dynamic strength tests. Leadoff examinations at velocities of 0.2 and 0.8 m/s had been carried out. There the comparison of ground reaction forces (external load) and the intersegment moments (internal load) showed differences between the position of their maxima and the characteristic run of curves.

Keywords

Ground Reaction Force Internal Load Cross Country Skiing Late Advancement Squat Jump 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bührle, M. (1989). Maximalkraft — Schnellkraft — Reaktivkraft. In Sportwissenschaft19, 3, 311–325.Google Scholar
  2. Hahn, D., Tusker, F. (2002). Beurteilung von Belastung und Beanspruchung der unteren Extremitäten beim Training mit einer Funktionsstemme. In Proceedings of the 5th symposium Biomechanik, Sportmotorik und Trainingswissenschaft, Leipzig, Germany, September 19–21.Google Scholar
  3. Komi, P.V. (2003). Stretch-Shortening Cycle. In Komi, P.V., ed., Strength and Power in Sport. Oxford: Blackwell, 2end edition. 184–202.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Schwirtz, A., Kibele, A., Neubert, A. (1995). Sportartspezifische Umsetzung der Sprungkraftmessung in der biomechanischen Leistungsdiagnostik. In Gollhofer, A., ed., Integrative Forschungsansätze in der Bio & Mechanik. St. Augustin: Academia. 277–285.Google Scholar
  5. Schwirtz, A., Neubert, A. (1995). Entwicklung der Beinstreckkraft und der Sprungkraft bei jugendlichen Skispringern, Skilangläufern und Alpinskifahrern. In Starischka, S., Carl, K. and Krug, J., eds., Schwerpunktthema Nachwuchstraining. Erlensee: SFT. 287–292.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ansgar Schwirtz
    • 1
  • Daniel Hahn
    • 1
  • Andreas Huber
    • 1
  • Anke Neubert
    • 1
  • Ferdinand Tusker
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biomechanics in Sports, Faculty of Sport ScienceTechnical University of MunichGermany

Personalised recommendations