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Introduction

  • John D. Robson
  • Colin J. Dodds
  • Donald B. Macvean
  • Vincent R. Paling
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 115)

Abstract

The subject of random vibration arises from the need to relate the response of a structure to an excitation which — by its nature — is not amenable to precise description. The designer of an aircraft, for example, must take account of the stresses which arise from runway roughness or air turbulence, although the imposed displacements or pressures vary with time in a manner which defies analytical description, and which indeed cannot even be known until the aircraft goes into service. Such problems arise in many forms in all branches of engineering, and orthodox vibration analysis gives no help in their solution. New techniques and concepts are required if such random ly varying excitations are to be treated.

Keywords

Random Vibration Random Excitation Essential Idea Theory Includ Response Determination 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bibliography for Chapter 1

  1. 1.1
    Crandall S.H. and Mark W.D.: Random Vibration in Mechanic al Systems: Academic Press 1963. Elementary account of the subject, restricted in scope, but with extended discussion of behaviour of two-freedom system, and some attention to implications of narrow band spectra. Little attention to cross-correlation.Google Scholar
  2. 1.2
    Robson J.D.: Introduction to Random Vibration: Edinburgh University Press 1963. Elementary account of the subject, but with different emphasis from 1.1 Much more attention to cross-correlation and to general problem.Google Scholar
  3. 1.3
    Crandall S.H.(ed): Random Vibration: Technology Press/Wiley 1958. Essentially lecture notes of course given at MIT in 1957, giving good picture of the state of the subject at that time. Bibliography also helpful.Google Scholar
  4. 1.4
    Crandall S.H.(ed): Random Vibration Vol.2: MIT Press 1963. Similar course given in 1962 giving updated picture of state of the subject. Good chapters on non-linear and non-stationary problems, and on practical applications.Google Scholar
  5. 1.5
    Bendat J.S.: Principles and Applications of Random Noise Theory: Wiley 1958. Extended account of random noise theory including basic principles, not confined to problems of vibration.Google Scholar
  6. 1.6
    Bendat J.S and Piersol A.G.: Measurement and Analysis of Random Data: Wiley 1065. Practically oriented treatment of theory based on experience of author’s “Measurement Analysis Corporation”, large ly in USA rocket program. Good account of theory, and its application to measurement of real random vibration.Google Scholar
  7. 1.7
    Lin Y.K.: Probabilistic Theory of Structural Dynamics: McGraw-Hill 1967. Idiosyncratic but evidently sound development of random vibration theory from first principles to advanced problems. Tendency to enlarge on subjects which particularly interest author, but this is not necessarily a fault.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • John D. Robson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Colin J. Dodds
    • 1
  • Donald B. Macvean
    • 1
  • Vincent R. Paling
    • 1
  1. 1.University of GlasgowUK
  2. 2.UdineItaly

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