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Gust-Excited Vibrations

  • G. Solari
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 335)

Abstract

A general frame of the problem of gust-excited vibrations of structures is given. The treatment is initially developed with reference to a rigid slender cylinder of infinite length immersed in a bi-dimensional wind field. On the basis of this set up are later derived the three classic formulations of the dynamic alongwind, crosswind and torsional vibrations of flexible constructions. General guidelines are also provided about the coupled three-dimensional vibrations of structures as well as other subjects strictly related to gust buffeting and not dealt with in the present note.

Keywords

Atmospheric Boundary Layer Torsional Vibration Atmospheric Turbulence Coherence Function Tall Building 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Solari
    • 1
  1. 1.University of GenovaGenovaItaly

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