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Curing of Epoxy Matrix Composites

  • A. C. Loos
  • G. S. Springer
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 348)

Abstract

Models were developed which describe the curing process of composites constructed from continuous fiber-reinforced, thermosetting resin matrix prepreg materials. On the basis of the models, a computer code was developed, which for flat-plate composites cured by a specific cure cycle, provides the temperature distribution, the degree of cure of the resin, the resin viscosity inside the composite, the void sizes, the temperatures and pressures inside voids, and the residual stress distribution after the cure. In addition, the computer code can be used to determine the amount of resin flow out of the composite and the resin content of the composite and the bleeder.

Keywords

Fibre Reinforce Polymer Resin Content Continuous Fiber Apparent Permeability Void Size 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. C. Loos
    • 1
  • G. S. Springer
    • 2
  1. 1.Virginia Polytechnic InstituteBlacksburgUSA
  2. 2.Stanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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