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ESF Clutch Driven Mechanisms and the ER Linear Reversing Motion Demonstrator

  • W. A. Bullough
  • A. R. Johnson
  • J. Makin
  • R. C. Tozer
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 429)

Abstract

The ESF clutch is formed by enclosing fluid between driver and driven plates and exciting it magnetically or electrostatically, or both, thereby enabling a torque or force transmission depending on whether the applied motion is rotary or linear respectively. Generally the more rewarding ESF clutch applications drive an inertial type of intermittent load, otherwise highly developed, mechanical and electrically closed or opened clutches are preferable on a cost and convenience basis. If a shaped motion is called for servo or stepper motors would be natural first choices. It follows that if the ESF clutch is to be employed it must have something special to offer and this derives from a combination of rapid switching capability and low output side inertia, see Figure 3.1.

Keywords

Cooling Capacity Work Input Outer Rotor Drive Rotor Output Rotor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References and Bibliography

  1. 1.
    Bullough W A, Johnson A R, Tozer R and Makin J. Methodology, performance and problems in ER clutch based positioning mechanisms. Plenary lecture at 6th Int. Conf. on ER Fluids. MR Suspensions and their applications, held Yamagata, published in Proc. pp 623–630 (1997). World Scientific Pub. Co.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Makin J, Fast acting controllers, rheologically based devices, interactions between fluid, ancillary materials. auxiliary devices and operating requirements, draft PhD thesis,.University of Sheffield, Department of Mechanical Engineering (2000).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Johnson A R, Bullough W A and Makin J, Dynamic simulation and performance of an ER clutch based reciprocating mechanism, Smart Mater. Struct 8 (1999), 591–600.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Rogers G F C and Mayhew Y R, Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Fluids, Blackwell, Oxford (1982).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. A. Bullough
    • 1
  • A. R. Johnson
    • 1
  • J. Makin
    • 1
  • R. C. Tozer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering Smart Machines, Materials and Related Technologies UnitThe University of SheffieldSheffieldEngland

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