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Modeling and Simulation of Human Locomotion

  • N. Berme
  • E. Oggero
  • G. Pagnacco
Conference paper
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 375)

Abstract

The human locomotive system is probably the most sophisticated and complex locomotive apparatus that ever existed. In order to understand how the models of such system are built, it is useful to consider the meaning and implication of modeling and simulation as an attempt to represent reality. The human locomotive apparatus can be considered as constituted of three systems (i.e. skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems) coupled together. Models can include a representation of one, two, or all three systems. The purpose and possibilities of each system are very different, and the accuracy of the results depends on the assumptions and formulation of the model. The possibility to verify such hypotheses relies on the state-of-the-art of measurement systems, currently available, for noninvasive assessment of human locomotion parameters.

Keywords

Ground Reaction Force Skeletal System Open Loop Control Muscular System Human Locomotion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Berme
    • 1
  • E. Oggero
    • 1
  • G. Pagnacco
    • 1
  1. 1.The Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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