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User Modeling pp 415-426 | Cite as

Managing Temporal Knowledge in Student Modeling

  • Paolo Giangrandi
  • Carlo Tasso
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 383)

Abstract

Changes in the user’s knowledge represent an important factor to be considered, particularly in the dialogue between a tutoring system and a student. In previous work we have proposed a representation formalism for describing the status and the evolution over time of a temporal student model. The specific goal of this paper is to show what algorithms can be used to manage such a temporal student model. The use of temporal constraints allows a system to cope with uncertainty and incompleteness in the information available about the student’s knowledge through the description of temporal information on different levels of precision. Furthermore, nonmonotonic inferences are exploited in order to extend the temporal information available about the student’s knowledge. Finally, by introducing suitable temporal constraints into the student model, we handle in a uniform and elegant way the problem of the existence of possible contradictions in the student’s knowledge.

Keywords

Temporal Constraint Student Model Nonmonotonic Reasoning Tutorial Session Implicit Belief 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paolo Giangrandi
    • 1
  • Carlo Tasso
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mathematics and Computer ScienceUniversity of UdineItaly

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