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User Modeling pp 203-214 | Cite as

Capturing a Conceptual Model for End-User Programming: Task Ontology As a Static User Model

  • Kazuhisa Seta
  • Mitsuru Ikeda
  • Osamu Kakusho
  • Riichiro Mizoguchi
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 383)

Abstract

To realize a human friendly conceptual level programming environment, it is very important to build a static user model based on the analysis of what concepts are most important for end-users when performing the task and which concepts of a problem solving specification could be out of their awareness. We have investigated a task ontology for building the static user model. Putting task ontology on the basis of a Conceptual LEvel Programming Environment, CLEPE, provides three major advantages: 1. It provides human-friendly primitives in terms of which users can easily describe their own problem solving process (descriptiveness, readability). 2. The systems with the ask ontology can simulate the problem solving process at an abstract level in terms of conceptual level primitives (conceptual level operationality). 3. It provides the ontology author with an environment for building a task ontology so that he/she can build a consistent and useful ontology.

Keywords

User Model Select Process Target Task Conceptual Entity Object Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazuhisa Seta
    • 1
  • Mitsuru Ikeda
    • 1
  • Osamu Kakusho
    • 2
  • Riichiro Mizoguchi
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Scientific and Industrial ResearchOsaka UniversityJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of Economics and Information ScienceHyogo UniversityJapan

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