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User Modeling pp 189-200 | Cite as

Pragmatic User Modelling in a Commercial Software System

  • Linda Strachan
  • John Anderson
  • Murray Sneesby
  • Mark Evans
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 383)

Abstract

While user modelling has become a mature field with demonstrable research systems of great power, comparatively little progress has been made in the development of user modelling components for commercial software systems. The development of minimalist user modelling components, simplified to provide just enough assistance to a user through a pragmatic adaptive user interface, is seen by many as an important step toward this goal. This paper describes the development, implementation, and empirical evaluation of a minimalist user modelling component for TIMS, a complex commercial software system for financial management. The experimental results demonstrate that a minimalist user modelling component does improve the subjective measure of user satisfaction. Important issues and considerations for the development of user modelling components for commercial software systems are also discussed.

Keywords

Cash Flow User Modelling User Satisfaction Financial Planning Novice User 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda Strachan
    • 1
  • John Anderson
    • 1
  • Murray Sneesby
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mark Evans
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of ManitobaCanada
  2. 2.Emerging Information Systems Inc.WinnipegCanada

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