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User Modeling pp 171-173 | Cite as

Adaptable and Adaptive Information Access for All Users, Including the Disabled and the Elderly

  • Josef Fink
  • Alfred Kobsa
  • Andreas Nill
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 383)

Abstract

The tremendously increasing popularity of the World Wide Web indicates that hypermedia is going to be the leading online information medium for the years to come and will most likely be the standard gateway to the “information highway”. Visitors of web sites are generally heterogeneous and have different needs, and this trend is likely even to increase in the future. The aim of the AVANTI project is to cater hypermedia information to these different needs by adapting the content and the presentation of web pages to each individual user. The special needs of elderly and handicapped users are also considered to some extent. Our experience from this research is that adaptation and user modeling techniques that have so far almost exclusively focused on adapting interactive software systems to “normal” users also prove useful for adaptation to users with special needs.

Keywords

User Modeling Blind User Handicapped User Information Highway Braille Display 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Josef Fink
    • 1
  • Alfred Kobsa
    • 1
  • Andreas Nill
    • 1
  1. 1.GMD FITGerman National Research Center for Information TechnologySt. AugustinGermany

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