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The Soul of A New Machine: The Soccer Robot Team of the FU Berlin

  • Raúl Rojas
  • Sven Behnke
  • Peter Ackers
  • Bernhard Frötschl
  • Wolf Linstrot
  • Manuel de Melo
  • Andreas Schebesch
  • Mark Simon
  • Martin Sprengel
  • Oliver Tenchio
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 431)

Abstract

This paper describes the hardware and software of the robotic soccer team built at the Freie Universität Berlin which took part in the 2000 RoboCup Championship in Melbourne, Australia. Our team, the FU Fighters, consists of five robots of less than 18 cm horizontal cross-section. Four of the robots have the same mechanical design, while the goalie is slightly different. All the hardware was designed and assembled at the FU Berlin. The paper describes the hierarchical control architecture used to generate the behavior of individual agents and the whole team. Our reactive approach is based on the dual dynamics framework proposed by Jäger, but extended with a third module of sensor readings. Fast changing sensors are aggregated in time to form slowly changing percepts in a temporal resolution hierarchy. We describe the main blocks of the software and their interactions.

Keywords

Sensor Reading Goal Line Wheel Motor Ball Target Subsumption Architecture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raúl Rojas
    • 1
  • Sven Behnke
    • 1
  • Peter Ackers
    • 1
  • Bernhard Frötschl
    • 1
  • Wolf Linstrot
    • 1
  • Manuel de Melo
    • 1
  • Andreas Schebesch
    • 1
  • Mark Simon
    • 1
  • Martin Sprengel
    • 1
  • Oliver Tenchio
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mathematics and Computer ScienceFreie Universität BerlinGermany

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