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Overview of Numerical Simulations of Electromagnetic Turbulence Control (EMTC)

  • Andrew W. Cary
  • John F. Donovan
  • Linda D. Kral
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 415)

Abstract

Electromagnetic Turbulence Control (EMTC) provides an innovative control technique for restructuring the boundary layer of a conducting fluid and, thereby, reducing viscous drag. The advantage of this approach over classical control methods is that it introduces a body force that can affect a large portion of the boundary layer. This electromagnetic force varies both temporally and spatially in a complex manner, allowing for a multitude of control possibilities. This paper investigates the capabilities of numerical simulations in computing these flows and examines the predicted flow physics to gain additional insight into the control mechanism. Simulations are reported for both isolated actuators and arrays of tiles. Many of the flow features and sensitivities detected experimentally are present in the computational results, but significant drag reduction is not obtained.

Keywords

Skin Friction Lorentz Force Drag Reduction Electromagnetic Force Viscous Drag 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew W. Cary
    • 1
  • John F. Donovan
    • 1
  • Linda D. Kral
    • 2
  1. 1.The Boeing CompanySt. LouisUSA
  2. 2.Washington UniversitySt. LouisUSA

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