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General Introduction to Structural Crashworthiness

  • Jorge A. C. Ambrosio
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 423)

Abstract

The term ‘structural crashworthiness’ is used to describe the impact performance of a structure when it collides with another object. A study into the structural crashworthiness characteristics of a system is required in order to calculate the forces during a collision which are needed to assess the damage to structures and the survivability of passengers in vehicles, for example. This topic embraces the collision protection of aircraft, buses, cars, trains, ships and offshore platforms, etc. [5.1–5.7] and even spacecraft [5.8]. No attempt is made to review the entire field and only that part which is related to dynamic progressive buckling introduced in the previous chapter is discussed briefly.

Keywords

Impact Velocity Impact Event Circular Tube Structural Impact Initial Kinetic Energy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jorge A. C. Ambrosio
    • 1
  1. 1.Instituto Superior TécnicoPortugal

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