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Neck Performance of Human Substitutes in Frontal Impact Direction

  • Jorge A. C. Ambrosio
Conference paper
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 423)

Abstract

In the past several laboratories have conducted human subject tests in order to derive biofidelity performance requirements for crash dummies and computer models. Both human volunteer and human cadaver tests have been conducted. Particularly noteworthy are the human volunteer tests conducted at the Naval Biodynamics Laboratory (NBDL) in New Orleans. In an extensive test program a large number of human subjects were exposed to impacts in frontal, lateral and oblique directions. Detailed analyses of these tests have been conducted and presented in various publications. Based on these results, a set of biofidelity performance requirements was developed. These requirements include trajectories and rotations of the head as well as acceleration requirements and data on the neck loads.

Keywords

Occipital Condyle Frontal Impact Neck Angle Volunteer Test Neck Performance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jorge A. C. Ambrosio
    • 1
  1. 1.Instituto Superior TécnicoPortugal

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