Introduction in Injury Biomechanics

  • Jorge A. C. Ambrosio
Conference paper
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 423)


Injury of the human body can be caused by different loading situations including mechanical, chemical, thermic and electric load. The field of injury biomechanics deals with the effect on the human body of mechanical loads, in particularly impact loads. Therefore also often the term “impact biomechanics” is used instead of “injury biomechanics”. Viano [20.1] defines the objectives and research methods of injury biomechanics as follows:


Injury Severity Injury Severity Score Injury Mechanism Human Cadaver Abbreviate Injury Score 


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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jorge A. C. Ambrosio
    • 1
  1. 1.Instituto Superior TécnicoPortugal

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