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Romansy 14 pp 309-316 | Cite as

Development of an Anthropomorphic Talking Robot to Mechanically Produce Human Voices

  • Kazufumi Nishikawa
  • Akihiro Imai
  • Takayuki Ogawara
  • Hideaki Takanobu
  • Takemi Mochida
  • Atuso Takanishi
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 438)

Abstract

This paper describes the mechanical design and the motion planning of the anthropomorphic talking robot WT-1R (Waseda Talker-No.1 Refined) for the production of human voices. In 2000, we mechanically produced Japanese vowels (/a/, /i/, /u/, /e/, /o/) using the first robot WT-1 (Waseda Talker-No.l). In 2001, we developed a second robot WT-1R, which is improvement over WT-l’s mechanisms for producing natural vowels and consonant sounds. WT-1R has articulators (the tongue, lips, teeth, nasal cavity and soft palate) and vocal organs (the lungs and vocal cords). The total DOF (degrees of freedom) is 15. Furthermore, we proposed the motion planning of WT-1R by considering the complicated phenomenon of the consonant sound as three parts (steady consonant sound, transient consonant sound and vowel). WT-1R could mechanically produce Japanese vowels (/a/, /i/, /u/, /e/, /o/) and some consonant sounds (/s/, /h/, /m/, /p/ and /waseda/).

Keywords

Nasal Cavity Vocal Cord Motion Planning Soft Palate Vocal Tract 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazufumi Nishikawa
    • 1
  • Akihiro Imai
    • 1
  • Takayuki Ogawara
    • 1
  • Hideaki Takanobu
    • 2
    • 4
  • Takemi Mochida
    • 5
  • Atuso Takanishi
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringWaseda UniversityJapan
  2. 2.Humanoid Robotics InstituteWaseda UniversityJapan
  3. 3.Advanced Research Institute for Science and EngineeringWaseda UniversityJapan
  4. 4.Department of Mechanical Systems EngineeringKogakuin UniversityJapan
  5. 5.NTT Communication Science LaboratoriesNTTJapan

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