Advertisement

Romansy 14 pp 101-108 | Cite as

Control of the Omnidirectional Mobile Robot MARGe

  • Houssem Abdellatif
  • Dirk Weidemann
  • Arne Michaelsen
  • Martin Grotjahn
  • Bodo Heimann
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 438)

Abstract

This paper presents the control architecture of the mobile robot MARGe. MARGe is a nonholonomic omnidirectional wheeled platform which is designed for flexible application to various tasks. In contrast to other centralised strategies known from literature, the control architecture is separated into different control levels. This allows the application of robust and well proven control laws on each level. The performance of the concept is proven by experimental results. Furthermore, a comparison of two different path control approaches is presented.

Keywords

Mobile Robot Control Architecture Path Control Belt Drive Wheel Mobile Robot 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Aguiar, A.P., Atassi, A.N., and Pascoal A.M. (2000). Regulation of nonholonomic dynamic wheeled mobile robot with parametric modeling uncertainty. In Proc. of the IEEE Int. Conf. on Decision and Contol, 2995–3000.Google Scholar
  2. Borenstein, J., Everett, H.R., and Feng, L. (1996). Navigating Mobile Robots, Systems and Techniques. A.K. Peters, Wellesley, MA.MATHGoogle Scholar
  3. Caracciolo, L., DeLuca, A., and Lannitti. (2000). Trajectory tracking control of a four-wheel differentially driven mobile robot. In Proc. of the 1999 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, 2632–2638.Google Scholar
  4. DeLuca, A., Oriolo, G., Venditelli, M. (2000). Stabilization of the unicycle via dynamic feedback linearisation. In Proc. of the 6th IFAC Symposium on Robot Control (SYROCO2000), 397–402.Google Scholar
  5. Dixon, W., Dawson, M., Zergeroglu, E., and Behal, A. (2001). Nonlinear Control of Wheeled Mobile Robots. Lectures Notes in Control and Information Sciences, Vol. 262, Springer, London.MATHGoogle Scholar
  6. Hanebeck, U.D., and Saldic, N. (1999). A modular wheel system for mobile robot applications. In Proc. Of the 1999IEEE/RSIIntern. Conf. on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS’99), 17–23.Google Scholar
  7. Horn, J. (1997). Bahnfiihrung eines mobilen Roboters. Fortschr.-Ber. VDI, Reihe 8, Nr. 617, VDI Verlag.Google Scholar
  8. Moore, K.L., and Flann, N.S. (2000). A six-wheeled omnidirectional autonomous mobile robot. IEEE Control Systems Magazine 20 (6), 53–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Slotine, J.-J., and Li, W: (1991). Applied Nonlinear Control. Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs.MATHGoogle Scholar
  10. Thuillot B., d’Andrea-Novel, B., and Micaelli, A. (1997). Modelling and feedback control of mobile robots equipped with several steering wheels. IEEE Transact. on Robotics and Automation 12 (3), 375–390.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Watanabe, K.S. (1998). Control of an omnidirectional mobile robot. In Proc. of the 1998 IEEE Second Intern. Conf. on Knowledge-Based Intelligent Electronic Systems, 51–60.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Houssem Abdellatif
    • 1
  • Dirk Weidemann
    • 1
  • Arne Michaelsen
    • 1
  • Martin Grotjahn
    • 1
  • Bodo Heimann
    • 1
  1. 1.Hanover Center of MechatronicsUniversity of HanoverGermany

Personalised recommendations