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Romansy 13 pp 275-284 | Cite as

Universal Dental Robot — 6-DOF Mouth Opening and Closing Training Robot WY-5

  • Hideaki Takanobu
  • Takeo Maruyama
  • Atsuo Takahashi
  • Kayoko Ohtsuki
  • Masatoshi Ohnishi
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 422)

Abstract

This paper describes the mechanism, control method, and training results of the 6 degrees-of-freedom (DOF) mouth-opening and -closing training robot WY-5 (Waseda Yamanashi No. 5) that is an application of the Universal Dental Robot (UDR). The mouth-opening training is indicated for the rehabilitation of the patients suffering from disturbance of the mouth-opening and -closing. The six linear actuators manipulate the u-shaped end-effector of UDR. This u-shaped end-effector is a moving platform of 6-DOF parallel manipulator. Each linear actuator has displacement, velocity, and force sensor to measure the position and orientation of the u-shaped end-effector. The WY-5 is a master-slave parallel robot that manipulates the patient’s mandible that can’t widely open. The doctor grasps the 2-DOF master manipulator, and the 6-DOF slave manipulator opens the patient’s mandible according to the master manipulator’s motion. As the result of therapy by using WY-5 for two female patients who cannot open their mouth widely, the mouth opening distance increased.

Keywords

Mouth Opening Parallel Mechanism Safety System Patient Manipulator Parallel Robot 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hideaki Takanobu
    • 1
  • Takeo Maruyama
    • 1
  • Atsuo Takahashi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kayoko Ohtsuki
    • 3
  • Masatoshi Ohnishi
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Science and EngineeringWaseda UniversityJapan
  2. 2.Humanoid Robotics InstituteWaseda UniversityJapan
  3. 3.Department of Oral and Maxillofacial SurgeryYamanashi Medical UniversityJapan

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