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User Lenses — Achieving 100% Precision on Frequently Asked Questions

  • Christopher C. Vogt
  • Garrison W. Cottrell
  • Richard K. Belew
  • Brian T. Bartell
Part of the CISM International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 407)

Abstract

The concept of a “user lens” is introduced. The lens is a sequence of linear transformations used to reweight the vectors which represent documents or queries in information retrieval systems. It is trained automatically via relevance data provided by the user. Experiments verify the lens can improve performance on training data while not degrading test data performance, and that larger lenses result in nearly perfect performance on the training set. The lens provides a mechanism for automatically capturing long-term, user-specific information about an improved representation scheme for document vectors.

Keywords

Weighting Scheme Relevance Feedback Ranking Score Information Retrieval System System Verification 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher C. Vogt
    • 1
  • Garrison W. Cottrell
    • 1
  • Richard K. Belew
    • 1
  • Brian T. Bartell
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and EngineeringUniversity of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA
  2. 2.Conceptual Dimensions, Inc.San DiegoUSA

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