Advertisement

Modeling the Social Practices of Users in Internet Communities

  • Mildred L. G. Shaw
  • Brian R. Gaines
Conference paper
Part of the CISM International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 407)

Abstract

As the Internet has become widely accessible mailing list servers are being used increasingly to support collaborative discourse in scholarly communities. The majority of these communities are open and new users may join who have met few, if any, of the other list members, and come to know them primarily through email discourse. However, new members joining the discourse of an established group may have difficulty calibrating their constructs with those of the existing members, particularly since the disciplinary background of members may not be evident and may vary widely. Major misunderstandings can arise because members use the same term with different technical meanings, or use different terms for the same construct. This article provides a framework for modeling the conceptual structures of members in an Internet community and describes web-based tools that can be used by members to develop models of the social practices of other users in the community and to calibrate their own use of terminology and constructs against those of others.

Keywords

Social Practice Knowledge Acquisition Scholarly Community Personal Construct Internet Community 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Atran, S. (1990). Cognitive foundations of natural history: towards an anthropology of science. Cambridge, UK, Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Bloor, David (1983). Wittgenstein: a social theory of knowledge. New York, Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Bourdieu, P., Passeron, J.-C. and Martin, M. de Saint (1994). Academic discourse: linguistic misunderstanding and professorial power. Cambridge, UK, Polity Press.Google Scholar
  4. Bradshaw, J.M., Ford, K.M., Adams-Webber, J.R. and Boose, J.H. (1993). Beyond the repertory grid: new approaches to constructivist knowledge acquisition tool development. International Journal of Intelligent Systems 8(2) 287–33.Google Scholar
  5. Brodkey, L. (1987). Academic writing as social practice. Philadelphia, Temple University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Callon, M., Law, J. and Rip, A., Ed. (1986). Mapping the Dynamics of Science and Technology. Basingstoke, UK, MacMillan.Google Scholar
  7. Flores-Mendez, R.A. (1997). Java concept maps for the learning web. Proceedings of ED-MEDIA ’97: World Conference on Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia. Charlottesville, VA, Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education.Google Scholar
  8. Gaines, B.R. and Norrie, D.H. (1997). Coordinating societies of research agents—IMS experience. Integrated Computer Aided Engineering 4(3) 179–190.Google Scholar
  9. Gaines, B.R. and Norrie, D.H. (1997). Coordinating societies of research agents—IMS experience. Integrated Computer Aided Engineering 4(3) 179–190.Google Scholar
  10. Gaines, B.R. and Shaw, M.L.G. (1989). Comparing the conceptual systems of experts. Proceedings of the Eleventh International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence. pp.633–638. San Mateo, California, Morgan Kaufmann.Google Scholar
  11. Gaines, B.R. and Shaw, M.L.G. (1993a). Basing knowledge acquisition tools in personal construct psychology. Knowledge Engineering Review 8(1) 49–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Gaines, B.R. and Shaw, M.L.G. (1993b). Eliciting knowledge and transferring it effectively to a knowledge-based systems. IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering 5(1) 4–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Gaines, B.R. and Shaw, M.L.G. (1995a). Collaboration through concept maps. Schnase, J.L. and Cunnius, E.L., Ed. Proceedings of CSCL95: Computer Support for Collaborative Learning, pp. 135–138. Mahwah, New Jersey, Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  14. Gaines, B.R. and Shaw, M.L.G. (1995b). WebMap: concept mapping on the web. World Wide Web Journal 1(1) 171–183.Google Scholar
  15. Gaines, B.R. and Shaw, M.L.G. (1997). Knowledge acquisition, modeling and inference through the World Wide Web. International Journal of Human-Computer Studies 46(6) 729–759.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Gaines, B.R. and Shaw, M.L.G. (1998). Developing for web integration in Sisyphus-IV: WebGrid-II experience. Gaines, B.R. and Musen, M.A., Ed. Proceedings of Eleventh Knowledge Acquisition Workshop. pp. http://ksi.cpsc.ucalgary.ca/KAW/KAW98/gaines.Google Scholar
  17. Gross, Alan G. (1990). The rhetoric of science. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Hull, R. and Gomez, F. (1998). Automatic acquisition of historical knowledge from encyclopedic texts. Gaines, B.R. and Musen, M.A., Ed. Proceedings of Eleventh Knowledge Acquisition Workshop. pp. http://ksi.cpsc.ucalgary.ca/KAW/KAW98/hull/.Google Scholar
  19. Kelly, G.A. (1955). The Psychology of Personal Constructs. New York, Norton.Google Scholar
  20. Kremer, R.A. and Gaines, B.R. (1996). Embedded interactive concept maps in web documents. Maurer, H., Ed. Proceedings of WebNet96. pp.273–280. Charlottesville, VA, Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education.Google Scholar
  21. Litowski, K.C. (1997). Category development based on semantic principles. Social Sciences Computer Review 15(4) 394–409.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Phillips, Derek L. (1977). Wittgenstein and scientific knowledge: a sociological perspective. Totowa, N.J., Rowman and Littlefield.Google Scholar
  23. Roberts, R.H. and Good, J.M.M., Ed. (1993). The Recovery of Rhetoric: Persuasive Discourse and Disciplinarity in the Human Sciences. Charlottesville, University of Virginia.Google Scholar
  24. Selzer, Jack (1993). Understanding scientific prose. Madison, Wis., University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  25. Shaw, M.L.G. (1979). Conversational heuristics for eliciting shared understanding. International Journal of Man-Machine Studies 11 621–634.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Shaw, M.L.G. (1980). On Becoming A Personal Scientist: Interactive Computer Elicita-tion of Personal Models Of The World. London, Academic Press.Google Scholar
  27. Shaw, M.L.G. and Gaines, B.R. (1983). A computer aid to knowledge engineering. Proceedings of British Computer Society Conference on Expert Systems, pp.263–271. Cambridge, British Computer Society.Google Scholar
  28. Shaw, M.L.G. and Gaines, B.R. (1989). A methodology for recognizing conflict, correspondence, consensus and contrast in a knowledge acquisition system. Knowledge Acquisition 1(4) 341–363.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Shaw, M.L.G. and Gaines, B.R. (1991). Supporting personal networking through computer networking. Proceedings of CHI’91: Human Factors in Computing Systems. pp. 437–438. New York, ACM Publications.Google Scholar
  30. Shotter, John (1993). Conversational realities: constructing life though language. London, SAGE Publications.Google Scholar
  31. Tennison, J. (1997). Linking APECKS to WebGrid-II. Department of Psychology, University of Nottingham. http://www.psychology.nottingham.ac.uk/staff/Jenifer.Tennison/APECKSAVebGrid.html.Google Scholar
  32. Tennison, J. and Shadbolt, N.R. (1998). APECKS: a Tool to Support Living Ontologies. Gaines, B.R. and Musen, M.A., Ed. Proceedings of Eleventh Knowledge Acquisition Workshop. pp. http://ksi.cpsc.ucalgary.ca/KAW/KAW98/tennison/.Google Scholar
  33. Wittgenstein, Ludwig (1958). Philosophical investigations. Oxford, Blackwell.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mildred L. G. Shaw
    • 1
  • Brian R. Gaines
    • 1
  1. 1.Knowledge Science InstituteUniversity of CalgaryAlbertaCanada

Personalised recommendations