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Semi-Rigid Connections in Steel Frames

  • M. Ivanyi
Part of the International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 419)

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to present the interaction of the steel frames and their joints and to describe an acceptable method of joint design. A key problem in dealing with joints is their classification, the basis of which is described in the Eurocodes and other available design codes in a variety of different ways. Eurocodes take into account whether the joint is applied within a frame with fixed nodes or within one with sway nodes. The method is based on the results of experiments, therefore it is of great importance to perform large scale experimental tests under both monotonic and cyclic loading. Engineering methods help us with establishing the load—displacement diagrams of frames by using simple techniques, in a way that local “softening” effects occurring in the vicinity of joints can also be taken into account. Engineering design is an activity of fair complexity, thus it is important to establish direct design methods which, while simple, take into consideration certain complex phenomena such as the stiffness and strength properties of the joints (including beam-to-column joints as well as column bases). The preparation of this chapter has been supported financially by the National Scientefic Research Fund of the Republic of Hungary (OTKA) under grant No.1020358.

Keywords

Plastic Hinge Steel Frame Rotational Stiffness Moment Capacity Column Base 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Ivanyi
    • 1
  1. 1.Budapest University of Technology and EconomicsBudapestHungary

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