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Healthy Subject Testing with the Robotic Gait Rehabilitation (RGR) Trainer

  • Maciej Pietrusinski
  • Iahn Cajigas
  • Paolo Bonato
  • Constantinos Mavroidis
Part of the CISM International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 544)

Abstract

The Robotic Gait Rehabilitation (RGR) Trainer has been designed to address secondary gait deviations in stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation. In this paper we describe the operating principle of the RGR Trainer and the systems ability to record the pelvic obliquity patterns (during normal gait and during hip hiking simulated by healthy subjects). Furthermore, we present results of experiment designed to teach new gait pattern in healthy subjects.

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Copyright information

© CISM, Udine 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maciej Pietrusinski
    • 1
  • Iahn Cajigas
    • 2
  • Paolo Bonato
    • 2
  • Constantinos Mavroidis
    • 1
  1. 1.Northeastern UniversityBostonUSA
  2. 2.Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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