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Muscle Activity Estimation Based on Inverse Dynamics, Muscle Stress Analysis by Finite Element Method

  • Kensho Hirasawa
  • Ko Ayusawa
  • Yoshihiko Nakamura
Part of the CISM International Centre for Mechanical Sciences book series (CISM, volume 544)

Abstract

This paper proposes a method to estimate muscle activity with taking account the volumetric effects of muscles. We analyze muscles as elastic bodies by using finite element method combined with computation technique in robotics. We describe the way to estimate muscle force and deformation as the problem to find muscle activity which produce joint torque calculated by inverse dynamics subject to equilibrium equation of elastic bodies. This problem is solved as sequential quadratic programming with finite element analysis in parallel for each muscle.

Keywords

Muscle Activity Joint Angle Elastic Body Sequential Quadratic Programming Joint Torque 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© CISM, Udine 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kensho Hirasawa
    • 1
  • Ko Ayusawa
    • 1
  • Yoshihiko Nakamura
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechano-InformaticsThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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