Ethics and extraterrestrial life

  • Charles Cockell
Part of the Studies in Space Policy book series (STUDSPACE, volume 5)

Abstract

The study of other planets and moons in the Solar System has revealed the presence of environments that may be conducive to life. The discovery of sulphate- bearing rocks on Mars,201 and the suggestion that they were formed in bodies of standing water,has invigorated the debate on the subject of the past,or even present,existence of life on Mars. In parallel,the investigation of Europa,202 a satellite of the giant gas planet Jupiter,has shown the presence of a salty ocean beneath an icy crust.

Keywords

Life Form Environmental Ethic Moral Consideration Extrasolar Planet Latent Tendency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag/Wien 2011

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  • Charles Cockell

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