On Why-Questions in Physics

  • Gergely Székely
Part of the Veröffentlichungen des Instituts Wiener Kreis book series (WIENER KREIS, volume 16)

Abstract

In the natural sciences, the most interesting and relevant questions are the so-called why-questions. What is a why-question? A why-question is nothing else than a question in the form “Why P?” (or “Why is P true?”) where P is an arbitrary statement.

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  • Gergely Székely

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