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Identität und Protest

Ein sozialpsychologischer Ansatz
  • Bert Klandermans

Zusammenfassung

Identität, Ungerechtigkeit und strategische Handlungsorientierung2 sind drei entscheidende Konzepte einer Sozialpsychologie des Protestes. Tatsächlich zielt Gamsons Konzeptio-nalisierung kollektiver Handlungsrahmen (Gamson 1992; Gamson et al. 1982) auf das Zusammenwirken dieser drei Faktoren ab.

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bert Klandermans
    • 1
  1. 1.Freien UniversitätAmsterdamNiederlande

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