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Bodies, Choices, Globalizing Neo-colonial Enchantments: African Matriarchs and Mammy Water

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Part of the Schriftenreihe der Internationalen Frauenuniversität »Technik und Kultur« book series (SIFU, volume 6)

Abstract

As I engage the discourse on empowering and disempowering agencies in body signs, I will examine collectivist notions of women’s solidarity in relation to women’s power in traditional cultures and societies in Africa. More importantly, it is my intention to highlight growing tensions between this traditional African matriarchitarianism and new counter-forces in notions of individual agency in cultural encounters and subsequent contestations in post-colonial and neocolonial African contexts. With globalization, new biologies, new desires, new destinies, how is subversion renegotiated and at what cost? What is the place of individual self and choice for women and girls in the new conditions of social change?

Keywords

African Woman Beautiful Woman African Literature Circumcision Ritual Africa World 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2002

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