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Die Nachbarschaft, die Stadt und der Club: Wissensmilieus in Projektökologien

  • Gernot Grabher
Chapter

Zusammenfassung

Die Themen Innovation und Lernen haben nicht erst im Zuge der bisweilen aufgeregten Revolutionsdiagnosen und visionären Prophetien um die Informations- oder Wissensgesellschaft Konjunktur, sondern zählen seit längerem zum Themenkanon sozial- und wirtschaftswissenschaftlicher Forschung. Dem Vektor Zeit wurde dabei in der Innovationsforschung traditionell eine prominente Rolle zugewiesen, etwa bei Marx, Kondratieff oder Schumpeter. Vergleichsweise untertheoretisiert blieb demgegenüber der Vektor Raum.

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  • Gernot Grabher

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