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Pragmatik pp 312-323 | Cite as

Why Gricean Democracy Is Worse than Either Russellian or Strawsonian Monarchy

  • Savas L. Tsohatzidis
Chapter
  • 155 Downloads
Part of the Linguistische Berichte book series (LINGB)

Abstract

Triads of sentences like those below — that is, an affirmative subject-predicate sentence with a definite description in subject position, a negative subject-predicate sentence with the same definite description in subject position, and a sentence affirming that at least one entity of the sort denoted by the definite description exists — are well known for provoking incompatible reactions to the question whether classical two-valued logic provides an appropriate model for the representation of meaning in natural language:
  1. (1)

    The King of France is bald.

     
  2. (2)

    The King of France is not bald.

     
  3. (3)

    There is a King of France.

     
Strawson (1950) and Russell (1905) are classic expressions of conflicting answers to that question.

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References

  1. Grice, P.H. (1981): “Presupposition and conversational implicature”. In: P. Cole, ed.: Radical Pragmatics. New York: Academic Press, 183–198.Google Scholar
  2. Russell, B. (1905): “On denoting”. Mind 14, 479–499.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Strawson, P.F. (1950): “On referring”. Mind 59, 320–344.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Savas L. Tsohatzidis
    • 1
  1. 1.ThessalonikiGreece

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