Advertisement

Literatur

Chapter
  • 288 Downloads

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literatur

  1. Adams, M. J. (1989). Thinking skills curricula: Their promise and progress. Educational Psychologist, 24, 25–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Adelman, M. B. (1988). Cross-cultural adjustment: A theoretical perspective on social support. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 12, 183–205.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Adler, N. J. (1980). Cultural synergy: the management of cross-cultural organizations. In. W. W. Burke and L. D. Goodstein (Hrsg.), Trends and issues in organization development. Current theory and practice, 163–184. San Diego: University Associates.Google Scholar
  4. Adler, P. S. (1975). The transitional experience: An alternative view of culture shock. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 15, 13–23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Airasian, P. W. and Walsh, M. E. (1997). Constructivist cautions. Phi Delta Kappa, 78 (6), 444–449.Google Scholar
  6. Albert, R. (1983). The intercultural sensitizer or culture assimilator: A cognitive approach. In D. Landis and R. Brislin (Hrsg.), Handbook of intercultural training, Vol. 2, 186–217. Elmsford: Pergamon.Google Scholar
  7. Amir, Y. (1994). The contact-hypothesis in intergroup relations. In W. J. Lonner and R. S. Malpass (Hrsg.), Psychology and Culture, 231–237. Needham Heights: Allyn and Bacon.Google Scholar
  8. Amt für Nachrichtenwesen der Bundeswehr (1995). Informationsheft Ex-Jugoslawien. Bad Neuenahr-Ahrweiler: Amt für Nachrichtenwesen der Bundeswehr.Google Scholar
  9. Anderson, J. R. (1990). Cognitive psychology and ist implications (3nd. Ed.). New York: Freeman.Google Scholar
  10. Atkinson, P. and Hammersley, M. (1994). Ethnography and participant observation. In N. K.Denzin and Y. S. Lincoln (Hrsg.), Handbook of qualitative research, 248–261. Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  11. Ausubel, D. P. (1968). Educational Psychology. A cognitive view. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.Google Scholar
  12. Babiker, I. E., Cox, J. L. and Miller, P. M. (1980). The measurement of cultural distance and its relationship to medical consultations, symptomatology, and examination of performance of overseas students at Edinburgh University. Social Psychiatry, 15, 109–116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Baldwin, T. T. and Ford, J. K. (1988). Transfer of training: a review and directions for future research. Personnel Psychology, 41, 63–105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Bandura, A. (1979). Sozial-kognitive Lerntheorie. Stuttgart: Klett.Google Scholar
  15. Barker, R. G. (1968). Ecological psychology. Concepts and methods for studying the environment of human behavior. Stanford: University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Barron, B. J. S., Schwartz, D. L., Vye, N. J., Moore, A., Petrosino, A., Zech, L., Bransford, J. D. and CTGV (1998). Doing with understanding: lessons from research on problem-and project-based learning. The Journal of the Learning Sciences, 7 (3 and 4), 271–311.Google Scholar
  17. Barwise, K. J. and Perry, J. (1983). Situations and attitudes. Cambridge: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  18. Bateson, G. (1981). Sozialplanung und der Begriff des Deutero-Lernens. In ders., Ökologie des Geistes, 219–240. Frankfurt a. M.: Suhrkamp.Google Scholar
  19. Bednar, A. K., Cunningham, D., Duffy, T. M. and Perry, J. D. (1992). Theory into practice:How do we link? In T. M.Duffy and D. H. Jonassen (Hrsg.), Constructivism and the technology of instruction, 17–33. Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  20. Bennett, J. M. (1986). Modes of Cross-Cultural Training. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 10, 117–133.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Bennett, M. J. (1986). A developmental approach to training for intercultural sensitivity. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 10, 179–196.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Bennett, M. J. (1993). Towards ethnorelativism: a developmental model of intercultural sensitivity. In R. M. Paige (Hrsg.), Education for the intercultural experience (2 nd ed.), 21–71. Yarmouth: Intercultural Press.Google Scholar
  23. Berger, P. L. and Luckmann, T. (1969). Die gesellschaftliche Konstruktion der Wirklichkeit. Frankfurt a. M.: Fischer.Google Scholar
  24. Berry, J. W. (1985). Psychological adaptation of foreign students. In R. J. Samuda and A. Wolfgang (Hrsg.), Intercultural counseling and assessment. Global perspectives, 235–248. Lewiston: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  25. Berry, J. W. (1994). Acculturative stress. In W. J. Lonner and R. S. Malpass (Hrsg.), Psychology and Culture, 211–215. Needham Heights: Allyn and Bacon.Google Scholar
  26. Bhawuk, D. P. S. (1990). Cross-Cultural Orientation Programs. In R. W. Brislin (Hrsg.), Applied Cross-Cultural Psychology, 325–346. Newbury Park: Sage.Google Scholar
  27. Bhawuk, D. P. S. (1998). The role of culture theory in cross-cultural training: A multimethod study of culture-specific, culture-general, and culture theory-based assimilators. Journal of cross-cultural psychology, 29 (5), 630–655.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Bhawuk, D. P. S., Copeland, J., Yoshida, W. and Lim, K. (1999). The development of a multimedia culture assimilator: Issues facing adaptation from text to multimedia. Manuskript in Vorbereitung.Google Scholar
  29. Bhawuk, D. P. S. and Triandis, H. C. (1996). The role of culture theory in the study of culture and intercultural training. In D. Landis and R. S. Bhagat (Hrsg.), Handbook of intercultural training (2. Aufl.), 17–34.Google Scholar
  30. Bittner, A. (1996). Psychologische Aspekte der Vorbereitung und des Trainings von Fach-und Führungskräften auf einen Auslandseinsatz. In A. Thomas (Hrsg.), Psychologie interkulturellen Handelns, 317–339. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  31. Bittner, A. and Reisch, B. (1993). Contrast-Culture-Training. Königswinter: Institut für Interkulturelles Management.Google Scholar
  32. Black, J. S. and Mendenhall, M. (1990). Cross-Cultural Training Effectiveness: A Review and a Theoretical Framework for Future Research. Academy of Management Review, Vol. 15, 1, 113–136.Google Scholar
  33. Bochner, S. (1994). Culture shock. In W. J. Lonner and R. S. Malpass (Hrsg.), Psychology and Culture, 245–251. Needham Heights: Allyn and Bacon.Google Scholar
  34. Boesch, E. E. (1991). Symbolic action theory and cultural psychology. Berlin: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Boesch, E. E. (1976). Psychopathologie des Alltagslebens: Zur Okopsychologie des Handelns und seiner Störungen. Bern: Huber.Google Scholar
  36. Bransford, J. D. (1993). Who ya gonna call? Thoughts about teaching problem-solving. In P. Hallinger, K. Leithwood and J. Murphy (Hrsg.), Cognitive perspectives on educational leadership, 171–191. New York: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
  37. Bransford, J. D., Brown, A. L. and Cocking, R. R. (1999). How people learn: brain, mind, experience and school. Washington, D. C.: National Academy Press.Google Scholar
  38. Bransford, J. D., Franks, J. J., Vye, N. J. and Sherwood, R. D. (1989). New approaches to instruction: because wisdom can’t be told. In S.Vosniadou and A. Ortony (Hrsg.), Similarity and analogical reasoning, 331–354. Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  39. Bransford, J. D., Sherwood, R. D., Hasselbring, T. D., Kinzer, C. K. and Wiiliams, S. M. (1990). Anchored instruction: why we need it and how technology can help. In D. Nix and R. J. Spiro (Hrsg.), Cognition, education and multimedia: exploring ideas in high technology, 115–141. Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  40. Bransford, J. D. and Stein, B. S. (1984). The IDEAL problem solver. New York: Freeman.Google Scholar
  41. Bredo, E. (1994). Reconstructing educational psychology: Situated cognition and Deweyian pragmatism. Educational Psychologist, 29 (1), 23–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Breitenbach, D. (1974). Auslandsausbildung als Gegenstand sozialwissenschaftlicher Forschung. Saarbrücken: breitenbach.Google Scholar
  43. Breitenbach, D. (1983). Untersuchungseinheiten and Bezugsrahmen von Austauschstudien. In A. Thomas (Hrsg.), Erforschung interkultureller Beziehungen: Forschungsansätze and Perspektiven,69–76. Saarbrücken: breitenbach.Google Scholar
  44. Brislin, R. W. (1981). Cross-cultural encounters. Face-to-face interaction. New York: Pergamon.Google Scholar
  45. Brislin, R. W. (1989). Intercultural Communication Training. In M. Asante and W. Gudykunst (Hrsg.), Handbook of international and intercultural communication, 441–457. Newbury Park: Sage.Google Scholar
  46. Brislin, R. W. (1993). Understanding culture’s influence on behavior. Orlando: Harcourt.Google Scholar
  47. Brislin, R. W., Cushner, K, Cherrie, C. and Yong, M. (1986). Intercultural interactions: A practical guide. Beverly Hills: Sage.Google Scholar
  48. Brislin, R. W., Landis, D. and Brandt, M. (1983). Conceptualizations of intercultural behavior and training. In D. Landis and R. W. Brislin (Hrsg.), Handbook of intercultural training, 1, 1–34. Elmsford: Pergamon.Google Scholar
  49. Brislin, R. W. and Pedersen, P. (1976). Cross-Cultural Orientation Programs. New York: Gardner Press.Google Scholar
  50. Brislin, R. W. and Yoshida, T. (1994). Intercultural communication training. Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  51. Brown, A. L. (1997). Transforming schools into communities of thinking and learning about serious matters. American Psychologist, 52 (4), 399–413.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Brown, A. L. and Campione, J. C. (1990). Communities of learning and thinking, or A context by any other name. Human Development, 21, 108–125.Google Scholar
  53. Brown, A. L. and Campione, J. C. (1998). Designing a community of young learners: Theoretical and practical lessons. N. M. Lambert and B. L. McCombs (Hrsg.), How students learn: reforming schools through learner-centered education, 153–186. Washington D. C.: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  54. Brown, A. L. and Palincsar, A. S. (1989). Guided cooperative learning and individual knowledge acquisition. In L. B. Resnick (Hrsg.), Knowing, learning and instruction, 393–451. Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  55. Brown, J. S., Collins, A. Duguid, P. (1989). Situated cognition and the culture of learning. Educational researcher, 18, 32–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Bruner, J. (1961). The act of discovery. Harvard Educational Review, 31, 21–32. Bühler, K. (1934). Sprachtheorie. Die Darstellungsfunktion der Sprache. Stuttgart: Fischer.Google Scholar
  57. Casmir, F. L. (1999). Foundations for the study of intercultural communication based on a third-culture building model. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 23, 91–116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Church, A. T. (1982). Sojourner adjustment. Psychological Bulletin, 91, 540–572. Clancey, W. B. (1997). Situated Cognition. Cambridge: University Press.Google Scholar
  59. Cognition and Technology Group at Vanderbilt (1992). An Anchored Instruction ap-proach to cognitive skills acquisition and intelligent tutoring. In J. W. Regian and V. J. Shute (Hrsg.), Cognitive approaches to automated instruction, 135–170. Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  60. Cognition and Technology Group at Vanderbilt (1993). The Jasper Series: Theoretical foundations and data on problem solving and transfer. In L. A. Penner, G. M. Batsche, H. M. Knoff and D. L. Nelson (Hrsg.), The challenge in mathematics and science education, 113–152. Washington D. C.: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  61. Cognition and Technology Group at Vanderbilt (1997). The Jasper Project: Lessons in curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development. Mahwah: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  62. Cognition and Technology Group at Vanderbilt (in press). Adventures in anchored instruction: lessons from beyond the ivory tower.Google Scholar
  63. Cohn, R. (1975). Von der Psychoanalyse zur themenzentrierten Interaktion. Stuttgart: Klett.Google Scholar
  64. Cole, M. (1996). Cultural psychology: a once and future discipline. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  65. Cole, M. and Scribner, S. (1978). Introduction. In L. S. Vygotsky, Mind in society, 1–14. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  66. Coleman, H. L. K. (1997). Portfolio assessment of multicultural counseling competence. In D. B. Pope-Davis and H. L. K. Coleman (Hrsg.). Multicultural counseling competencies, 43–59. Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  67. Collins, A. (1992). Portfolios for science education: Issues in purpose, structure and authenticity. Science Education, 76 (4), 451–463.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Collins, A., Brown, J. S. and Newman, S. E. (1989). Cognitive apprenticeship: Teaching the crafts of reading, writing, and mathematics. In L. B. Resnick (Hrsg.), Knowing, learning and instruction: Essays in honour of Robert Glaser, 453–494. Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  69. Cronbach, L. J. (1967). How can instruction be adapted to individual differences? In R. M. Gagné (Hrsg.), Learning and individual differences, 42–58. Ohio: Columbus.Google Scholar
  70. Cushner, K. and Brislin, R. W. (1996). Intercultural interactions: A practical guide ( 2. Aufl.). Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  71. Cushner, K. and Landis, D. (1996). The Intercultural Sensitizer. In D. Landis and R. S. Bhagat (Hrsg.), Handbook of intercultural training (2 nd ed.), 185–202. Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  72. Dadder, R. (1987). Interkulturelle Orientierung. Saarbrücken: Breitenbach.Google Scholar
  73. David, K. H. (1972). Intercultural adjustment and applications of reinforcement theory to problems of “culture shock”. Trends, 1972, 4 (3), 1–64.Google Scholar
  74. David, K. H. (1976). The use of social learning theory in preventing intercultural adjustment problems. In P. Pedersen, W. J. Lonner and J. G. Draguns (Hrsg.), Counseling across cultures, 123–138. Honolulu: University Press of Hawaii.Google Scholar
  75. Demorgon, J. and Molz, M. (1996). Bedingungen und Auswirkungen der Analyse von Kultur(en) und interkulturellen Interaktionen. In A.Thomas (Hrsg.), Psychologie interkulturellen Handelns, 43–86. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  76. Detterman, D. L. (1993). The case for the prosecution: transfer as epiphenomenon. In D. K. Detterman and R. J. Sternberg (Hrsg.), Transfer on trial: intelligence, cognition and instruction. Norwood: Ablex.Google Scholar
  77. Detweiler, R. A. (1980). Intercultural interaction and the categorization process: a conceptual analysis and behavioral outcome. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 4, 275–293.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Dewey, J. (1910/1997). How we think. Mineola: Dover.Google Scholar
  79. Dewey, J. (1938a/1963). Experience and Education. New York: Collier.Google Scholar
  80. Dewey, J (1938b/1966). Logic.The theory of inquiry. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.Google Scholar
  81. Dewey, J. (1995). Erfahrung und Natur. Frankfurt a. M.: Suhrkamp.Google Scholar
  82. Dewey, J. and Bentley, A. (1949). Knowing and the known. Boston, MA: Beacon Press.Google Scholar
  83. Dinges, N. G. (1983). Intercultural competence. In D. Landis and R. W. Brislin (Hrsg.), Handbook of intercultural training (1 st ed.), 1, 176–202. New York: Pergamon.Google Scholar
  84. Dinges, N. G. and Baldwin, K. D. (1996). Intercultural competence. In D. Landis and R. S.Google Scholar
  85. Bhagat (Hrsg.), Handbook of intercultural training (2 nd ed.),106–123. Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  86. Döring, N. (1999). Sozialpsychologie des Internet. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  87. Dubs, R. (1995). Konstruktivismus: Einige Überlegungen aus der Sicht der Unterrichtsgestaltung. Zeitschrift für Pädagogik, 41 (6), 889–903.Google Scholar
  88. Duffy, T. M. and Jonassen, D. H. (Hrsg.) (1992). Constructivism and the technology of instruction. Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  89. Earley, P. C. (1987). Intercultural training for managers: A comparison of documentary and interpersonal methods. Academy of Management Journal, 30, 685698.Google Scholar
  90. Eckensberger, L. (1996a). Auf der Suche nach den (verlorenen?) Universalien hinter den Kulturstandards. In A. Thomas (Hrsg.), Psychologie interkulturellen Handelns, 165–197. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  91. Eckensberger, L. (1996b). Agency, Action and Culture: Three basic concepts for cross-cultural psychology. In J. Pandey, D. Sinha and D. P. S. Bhawuk (Hrsg.), Asian contributions to cross-cultural psychology, 72–102. New Delhi: Sage.Google Scholar
  92. Ehlich, K. and Switalla, B. (1976). Transkriptionssysteme–Eine exemplarische Ubersicht. Studium Linguistik, 1 (2), 78–105.Google Scholar
  93. Ekman, P. and Friesen, W. V. (1978). Facial Action Coding System. Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologists Press.Google Scholar
  94. Festinger, L. (1957). A theory of cognitive dissonance. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  95. Fiedler, F. E., Mitchell, T. and Triandis, H. C. (1971). The Culture Assimilator: An ap-proach to cross-cultural Training. Journal of Applied Psychology, 55, 2, 95–102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  96. Flanagan, J. C. (1954). The critical incident technique. Psychological Bulletin, 51 (4), 327–358.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  97. Foerster, H. V. (1987). Erkenntnistheorie und Selbstorganisation. In S. J. Schmidt (Hrsg.). Der Diskurs des radikalen Konstruktivismus, 133–158. Frankfurt a. M.: Suhrkamp.Google Scholar
  98. Foppa, K. (1986). „Typische Fälle“ und der Geltungsbereich empirischer Befunde. Schweizerische Zeitschrift für Psychologie, 45 (3), 151–163.Google Scholar
  99. Ford, M. E. (1995). Intelligence and Peronality in Social Behavior. In D. H. Saklofske and M. Zeidner (Hrsg.), International Handbook of Personality and Intelligence, 125–142. New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  100. Fortmüller, R. (1991). Der Einfluß des Lernens auf die Bewältigung von Problemen: Eine kognitionspsychologische Analyse des Problembereiches Transfer. Wien: Manz.Google Scholar
  101. Fowler, S. M. and Mumford, M. G. (Hrsg.) (1995). Intercultural Sourcebook: Cross-Cultural Training Methods, Vol. 1. Yarmouth: Intercultural Press.Google Scholar
  102. Fumham, A. and Bochner, S. (1982). Social difficulty in a foreign culture: an empirical analysis of culture shock. In S. Bochner (Hrsg.), Cultures in contact, 161–198. Oxford: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  103. Gardner, H. (1989). To open minds. New York: Basic books.Google Scholar
  104. Garner, W. R. (1974). The processing of information and structure. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  105. Gannon, M. J. and Poon, J. M. L. (1997). Effects of alternative instructional approaches on cross-cultural training outcomes. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 21 (4), 429–446.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  106. Gergen, K. J. (1985). The social constructionist movement in modern psychology. American Psychologist, 40 (3), 266–275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  107. Gergen, K. J. (1995). Social construction and the educational process. In L. P. Steffe and Gale (Hrsg.), Constructivism in education, 17–39. Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  108. Gerstenmaier, J. and Mandl, H. (1995). Wissenserwerb unter konstruktivistischer Per-spektive. Zeitschrift für Pädagogik, 41 (6), 867–888.Google Scholar
  109. Geulen, D. (1982). Soziales Handeln und Perspektivenübernahme. In ders. (Hrsg.), Perspektivenübernahme und soziales Handeln, 24–72. Frankfurt a. M.: Suhrkamp.Google Scholar
  110. Gibson, J. J. (1966). The senses considered as perceptual systems. Boston: Houghton.Google Scholar
  111. Gibson, J. J. (1979). The ecological approach to visual perception. Boston: Houghton.Google Scholar
  112. Gick, M. and Holyoak, K. J. (1983). Schema induction and analogical transfer. Cognitive Psychology, 15, 1–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  113. Glasersfeld, E. v. (1987). Wissen, Sprache und Wirklichkeit. Braunschweig: Vieweg. Goldstein, I. L. ( 1990 ). Trainings in work organizations. In M. D. Dunette and L. M.Google Scholar
  114. Hough (Hrsg.), Handbook of industrial and organizational psychology, 2,508–619. Palo Alto: Consulting Psychology Press.Google Scholar
  115. Gräsel, C. (1997). Problemorientiertes Lernen. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  116. Grammer, K. and Eibl-Eibesfeldt, I. (1993). Emotionspsychologische Aspekte im Kulturvergleich. In A. Thomas (Hrsg.), Kulturvergleichende Psychologie, 297–322. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  117. Grawe, K, Donati, R. and Bernauer, F. (1995). Psychotherapie im Wandel: Von der Konfession zur Profession. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  118. Greeno, J. G. (1989a) A perspective on thinking. American Psychologist, 44 (2), 134–141.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  119. Greeno, J. G. (1989b). Situations, mental models, and generative knowledge. In D. Klahr and K. Kotovsky (Hrsg.), Complex information processing: The impact of H. A. Simon, 285–318. Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  120. Greeno, J. G. (1998). The situativity of knowing, learning, and research. American Psychologist, 53 (1), 5–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  121. Greeno, J. G., Collins, A. M. and Resnick, L. (1996). Cognition and Learning. In R. C. Calfee and D. C. Berliner (Hrsg.), Handbook of Educational Psychology, 15–46. New York: Mac Millan.Google Scholar
  122. Greeno, J. G. and Moore, J. L. (1993). Situativity and symbols: Response to Vera and Simon. Cognitive Science, 17, 49–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  123. Greeno, J. G., Smith, D. R. and Moore, J. L. (1993). Transfer of situated learning. In D. K. Detterman and R. J. Sternberg (Hrsg.), Transfer on trial: intelligence, cognition and instruction, 99–167. Norwood: Ablex.Google Scholar
  124. Groeben, N. (1998). Zur Kritik einer unnötigen, widersinnigen und destruktiven Radikalität. In H. R. Fischer (Hrsg.). Die Wirklichkeit des Konstruktivismus, 149–159. Heidelberg: Auer.Google Scholar
  125. Grove, C. L. and Torbiörn, I. (1985). A new conceptualization of intercultural adjustment and the goals of training. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 9, 205–233.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  126. Gruber, H. (1999). Erfahrung als Grundlage kompetenten Handelns. Bern: Huber.Google Scholar
  127. Gudykunst, W. B. and Hammer, M. R. (1983). Basic training design: approaches to intercultural training. In D. Landis and R. W. Brislin (Hrsg.), Handbook of Intercultural Training, Vol.1, 118–154. New York: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  128. Gudykunst, W. B. (1995). Anxiety/Uncertainty management (AUM) theory: Current status. In R. Wiseman (Hrsg.), Intercultural communication theory, 1–58. Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  129. Gudykunst, W. B., Guzley, R. M. and Hammer, M. R. (1996). Designing Intercultural Training. In D. Landis and R. S. Bhagat (Hrsg.), Handbook of Intercultural Training (2nd Ed.), 61–80. Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  130. Gudykunst, W. B. and Ting-Toomey, S. (1988).Culture and interpersonal communication. Newbury Park: Sage.Google Scholar
  131. Guthrie, G. (1967). Cultural preparation for the Philippines. In R. B. Textor (Hrsg.), Cultural Frontiers of the Peace Corps. Cambridge: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  132. Guthrie, G. (1975). A behavioral analysis of culture learning. In R. W. Brislin, S. Bochner and W. J. Lonner (Hrsg.), Cross-cultural perspectives on learning, 95115. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  133. Habermas, J. (1981). Theorie des kommunikativen Handelns. Frankfurt: Suhrkamp.Google Scholar
  134. Hall, E. T. (1959). The silent language. New York: Doubleday.Google Scholar
  135. Hall, E. T. (1976). Beyond culture. Garden City: Doubleday.Google Scholar
  136. Hansen, D. and Rausch, K. (1995). Truppenpsychologische Einsatzbegleitung. Erfahrungen aus dem UNOSOM II-Einsatz. Bundesministerium der Verteidigung (Hrsg.), Arbeitsberichte Psychologischer Dienst der Bundeswehr (Nr. 2/95). Bonn.Google Scholar
  137. Harrison, J. K. (1992). Individual and combined effects of Behavior Modeling and the Culture Assimilator in cross-cultural management training. Journal of Applied Psychology, 77 (6), 952–962.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  138. Harrison, J. K., Chadwick, M. and Scales, M. (1996). The relationship between cross-cultural adjustment and the personality variables of self-efficacy and self-monitoring. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 20 (2), 167–188.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  139. Harrison, R. and Hopkins, R. L. (1967). The design of cross-cultural training: An alternative to the University model. The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, Vol. 3, Nr. 4, 431–460.Google Scholar
  140. Hatano, G. and Inagaki, K. (1992). Desituating cognition through the construction of conceptual knowledge. In P. Light and G. Butterworth (Hrsg.), Context and cognition, 115–133. New York: Harvester.Google Scholar
  141. Hawes, F. and Kealey, D. J. (1981). An empirical study of Canadian technical assistance: Adaptation and effectiveness on overseas assignment. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 5, 239–258.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  142. Heider, F. (1977/1958). Psychologie der interpersonalen Beziehungen. Stuttgart: Klett.Google Scholar
  143. Held, J. (1997). Interkulturelles Lernen aus der Sicht der kritischen Psychologie. Unveröff. Vortragsmanuskript, gehalten auf der Tagung der SIETAR-Deutschland, 29.5.1997. Technische Universität Chemnitz.Google Scholar
  144. Hendrickson, G. and Schroeder, W. (1941). Transfer of training in learning to hit a submerged target. Journal of Educational Psychology, 32, 206–213.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  145. Herrmann, T. (1984). Methoden als Problemlösungsmittel. In E. Roth (Hrsg.), Sozi-alwissenschaftliche Methoden, 18–46. München: Oldenbourg.Google Scholar
  146. Höffe, O. (1999). Gibt es ein interkulturelles Strafrecht? Ein philosophischer Versuch. Frankfurt: Suhrkamp.Google Scholar
  147. Hoffmann,O. (1995). Die Beteiligung der Bundeswehr an der Freidensaufgabe der Vereinten Nationen. In U. Hartmann and C. Walther (Hrsg.), Der Soldat in einer Welt im Wandel,98–108. Olzog-Verlag.Google Scholar
  148. Hofstede, G. (1980). Cultures consequences: international differences in work-related values. Beverly Hills: Sage.Google Scholar
  149. Holm, C. (1998). Reise-Knigge Asien. Der Spiegel Spezial „Asien“, Frühjahr 1998. Holsti, O. R. (1969). Content analysis for the social sciences and humanities. Reading: Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
  150. Holzkamp, K. (1995). Lernen: Subjektwissenschaftliche Grundlegung. Frankfurt: Campus.Google Scholar
  151. Hopf, C. (1991). Das qualitative Interview. In U. Flick, E. v. Kardorff, H. Keupp, L. v. Rosenstiel and S. Wolff (Hrsg.), Handbuch qualitative Sozialforschung, 177–182. München: PVU.Google Scholar
  152. Hopkins, R. L. (1993). David Kolbs experiential learning machine. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology, 24 (1), 46–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  153. Hopkins, R. L. (1994). Narrative schooling. Experiential learning and the transformation of American education. New York: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
  154. Hoyos, C. Graf, Frey, D. and Stahlberg, D. (1992). Angewandte Psychologie: zur Eingrenzung und Beschreibung einer psychologischen Disziplin. In D. Frey, C. Graf Hoyos and D. Stahlberg (Hrsg.), Angewandte Psychologie, 21–35. Weinheim: Beltz.Google Scholar
  155. Hron, A. (1994). Interview. In G. Huber and H. Mandl (Hrsg.), Verbale Daten, 119–140. Weinheim: Beltz.Google Scholar
  156. Jacobson, W., Sleicher, D. and Maureen, B. (1999). Portfolio assessment of intercultu-ral competence. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 23 (3), 467–492.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  157. Jahoda, G. (1996). Ansichten über die Psychologie und die “Kultur”. In A. Thomas (Hrsg.), Psychologie interkulturellen Handelns, 33–42. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  158. James, W. (1981/1907). Pragmatism. Indianapolis: Hackett.Google Scholar
  159. Janssen, C. J. (1996). „Ein bißchen ‘bi’ schadet nie“. Truppenpraxis and Wehrausbildung, 8, 558–565.Google Scholar
  160. Jonassen, D. H. (1992). Evaluating constructivistic learning. In T. M. Duffy and D. H. Jonassen (Hrsg.), Constructivism and the technology of instruction: a conversation, 137–148. Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  161. Judd, C. H. (1908). The relation of special training and general intelligence. Educational Review, 36, 42–48.Google Scholar
  162. Kammhuber, S. (1996). Konzeption, Einsatz und Evaluation von Videosequenzen in interkulturellen Orientierungsseminaren. Unveröff. Diplomarbeit. Universität Regensburg: Institut für Psychologie.Google Scholar
  163. Kanfer, F. H., Reinecker, H. and Schmelzer, D. (1991). Selbstmanagement-Therapie. Berlin: Springer.Google Scholar
  164. Kealey, D. J. and Ruben, B. D. (1983). Cross-cultural personnel selection criteria, issues, and methods. In D. Landis and R. W. Brislin (Hrsg.), Handbook of intercultural training (1 st ed.), 1, 155–175. New York: Pergamon.Google Scholar
  165. Kinast, E.-U. (1998). Evaluation interkultureller Trainings. Lengerich: Pabst. Kirkpatrick, D. L. ( 1967 ). Evaluation of training. In R. Craig and L. R. Bittel (Hrsg.)Google Scholar
  166. Training and development handbook,87–112. New York: McGraw Hill. Kirkpatrick, D. L. (1979). Techniques for evaluating training programs. Training and Development Journal, 33 (6), 78–92.Google Scholar
  167. Klein, P. (1995). Nationale Stereotype bei deutschen und französischen Soldaten. In R. Wakenhut and J. R. Gallenmüller-Roschmann (Hrsg.), Ethnisches und nationales Bewußtsein, 111–125. Frankfurt a. M.: Lang.Google Scholar
  168. Kleinginna, P. R. and Kleinginna, A. M. (1981). A categorized list of emotion definitions with suggestions for a consensual definition. Motivation and Emotion, 5 (4), 345–379.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  169. Köckeis-Stangl, E. (1980). Methoden der Sozialisationsforschung. In D. Ulich and K. Hurrelmann (Hrsg.), Handbuch der Sozialisationsforschung, 321–370. Weinheim: Beltz.Google Scholar
  170. Kohls, L. R. (1987). Four traditional approaches to developing cross-cultural preparedness in adults: Education, Training, Orientation, and Briefing. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 11, 89–106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  171. Kohls, L. R. and Knight, J. M. (1994). Developing intercultural awareness: A cross-cultural training handbook. Yarmouth: Intercultural Press.Google Scholar
  172. Kolb, D. A. (1984). Experiential learning. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
  173. Krewer, B. (1992). Kulturelle Identität und menschliche Selbsterforschung. Saarbrükken: Breitenbach.Google Scholar
  174. Krewer, B. (1993). Interkulturelle Trainingsprogramme-Bestandsaufnahme und Perspektiven. Vortrag im Rahmen der Konferenz,Europäische Qualifikation durch deutsch-französische Ausbildung?`. Frankreichzentrum der Universität Freiburg.Google Scholar
  175. Krewer, B. (1996). Kulturstandards als Mittel der Selbst-und Fremdreflexion in inter-kulturellen Begegnungen. In A. Thomas (Hrsg.), Psychologie interkulturellen Handelns, 147–164. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  176. Krewer, B. (1996b). Innovation across cultural borders. Luxembourg: Innovation Programme European Commission DG XIII/D/1Google Scholar
  177. Kroeber, A. A. and Kluckhohn, C. (1952). Culture: A critical review of concepts and definitions. Cambridge, MA: Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
  178. Kruger, A. C. and Tomasello, M. (1996). Cultural learning and learning culture. In D. R. Olson and N. Torrance (Hrsg.), The handbook of education and human development, 369–387. Cambridge: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  179. Kühlmann, T. M. (1995). Die Auslandsentsendung von Fach-und Führungskräften: Eine Einführung in die Schwerpunkte und Ergebnisse der Forschung. In ders. (Hrsg.), Mitarbeiterentsendung ins Ausland, 1–30. Göttingen: Verlag für Angewandte Psychologie.Google Scholar
  180. Landis, D. and Bhagat, R. S. (Hrsg.) (1996). Handbook of Intercultural Training. Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  181. Landis, D.; Brislin, R. W. and Hulgus (1985). Attributional training versus contact in acculturative learning: A laboratory study. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 15, 466–482.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  182. Lange, C. (1994). Interkulturelle Orientierung am Beispiel der Trainingsmethode “Cultural Assimilator”. Beiträge zur interkulturellen Didaktik, Bd. 3. Göttingen: Zentrum für didaktische Studien e. V..Google Scholar
  183. Laucken, U. (1996). Semantische Räume: Die Entcartesierung des Geistes. Handlung, Kultur, Interpretation, 5 (9), 158–215.Google Scholar
  184. Lave, J. (1988). Cognition in practice: Mind, mathematics and culture in everyday life. Cambridge. Cambridge: University Press.Google Scholar
  185. Lave, J. (1997). On learning. Forum kritische Psychologie, 38, 120–135.Google Scholar
  186. Lave, J. and Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge: University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  187. Law, L. C. (1998). Bridging the gap between knowledge and action: A situated cognition view. Forschungsbericht Nr. 92. München: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Lehrstuhl für Empirische Pädagogik und Pädagogische Psychologie.Google Scholar
  188. Layes, G. (1995). Quantitative Evaluation eines interkulturellen Managementtrainings für deutsche Manager zur Vorbereitung auf die Kooperation mit Chinesen. Unveröff. Diplomarbeit. Universität Regensburg: Institut für Psychologie.Google Scholar
  189. Layes, G. (1999). Grundformen des Fremderlebens. Eine Analyse von Handlungsorientierungen in der interkulturellen Interaktion. Unveröff. Dissertation. Universität Regensburg: Institut für Psychologie.Google Scholar
  190. Lemke, S. G. (1995). Transfermanagement. Göttingen: Verlag für Angewandte Psychologie.Google Scholar
  191. Liang, Y. (1996). Sprachroutinen und Vermeidungsrituale im Chinesischen. In A. Thomas (Hrsg.), Psychologie interkulturellen Handelns, 247–268. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  192. Limpächer, S. (1998). Gestaltung und Vergleich von systemvermittelnder und situierter Lernumgebung zur Qualifizierung interkultureller Trainings. Unveröff. Diplomarbeit, Universität Regensburg: Institut für Psychologie.Google Scholar
  193. Mandl, H, Prenzel, M. and Gräsel, C. (1992). Das Problem des Lerntransfers in der betrieblichen Weiterbildung. Unterrichtswissenschaft, 2, 126–143.Google Scholar
  194. Mandl, H., Gruber, H. and Renkl, A. (1996). Communities of practice toward expertise: Social foundation of university instruction. In P. B. Baltes and U. M. Staudinger (Hrsg.). Interactive minds, 394–411. Cambridge: University Press.Google Scholar
  195. Mandl, H., Gruber, H. and Renkl, A. (1994). Problems of knowledge utilization in the development of expertise. In W. Nijhof and J. Streumer (Hrsg.), Flexibility and cognitive structure in vocational education, 291–305. Utrecht: Lemma.Google Scholar
  196. Mandl, H. and Reinmann-Rothmeier, G. (1995). Unterrichten und Lernumgebungen gestalten (Forschungsbericht Nr. 60 ). München: Ludwig-MaximiliansUniversität, Institut für Pädagogische Psychologie und Empirische Pädagogik.Google Scholar
  197. Mansell, M. (1981). Transcultural experience and expressive response. Communication Education, 30, 93–108.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  198. Maringer, J. (1980). Das Kreuz als Zeichen und Symbol in der vorchristlichen Welt. Sankt Augustin: Anthropos-Verlag.Google Scholar
  199. Markowsky, R. and Thomas, A. (1995). Studienhalber in Deutschland. Interkulturelles Orientierungstraining für amerikanische Studenten, Schüler und Praktikanten. Heidelberg: Asanger.Google Scholar
  200. Markus, H. R. and Kitayama, S. (1991). Culture and the self: Implications for cognition, emotion, and motivation. Psychological Review, 98 (2), 224–253.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  201. Matthes, J. (im Druck). Was heißt interkulturelle Kompetenz? Manuskript in Vorbereiung.Google Scholar
  202. Maturana, H. R. and Varela, F. J. (1987). Der Baum der Erkenntnis. Bern: Scherz. Mayring, P. (1993). Qualitative Inhaltsanalyse: Grundlagen und Techniken. Weinheim: Deutscher Studien Verlag.Google Scholar
  203. McArthur, L. Z. and Baron, R. M. (1983). Toward an ecological theory of social perception. Psychological Review, 90 (3), 215–238.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  204. Mc Caffery, J. A. (1993). Independent effectiveness and unintended outcomes of Cross-cultural orientation and training. In R. M. Paige (Hrsg.), Education for the intercultural experience, 219–240. Yarmouth: Intercultural Press.Google Scholar
  205. McLellan, H. (Hrsg.) (1996). Situated Learning Perspectives. Englewood Cliffs: Educational Technology Publications.Google Scholar
  206. McLellan, H. (1996). Evaluation in a situated learning environment. In H. McLellan (Hrsg.), Situated learning perspectives, 101–111. Englewood Cliffs: Educational Technology Publications.Google Scholar
  207. Merten, K. (1995). Inhaltsanalyse. Einführung in Theorie, Methode und Praxis. Opladen: Westdeutscher Verlag.Google Scholar
  208. Mestenhauser, J. A. (1988). Concepts and theories of culture learning. In J. A. Mestenhauser, G. Marty and I. Steglitz (Hrsg.), Culture, learning and the disciplines, 133–167. Washington D. C.: NAFSA.Google Scholar
  209. Mezirow, J. (1981). A critical theory of adult learning and education. Adult education, 32 (1), 3–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  210. Mezirow, J., and associates (1990). Fostering critical reflection in adulthood. A guide to transformative and emancipatory learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  211. Mezirow, J. (1997). Transformative Erwachsenenbildung. Hohengehren: Schneider-Verlag.Google Scholar
  212. Mittenecker, E. (1987). Video in der Psychologie: Methoden und Anwendungsbeispiele in Forschung und Praxis. Bern: Huber.Google Scholar
  213. Moosmüller, A. (1997). Kommunikationsprobleme in amerikanisch-japanischdeutschen Teams: Kulturelle Synergie durch interkulturelles Training? Zeitschrift für Personalführung, 3, 282–297.Google Scholar
  214. Müller, A. and Thomas, A. (1991). Interkulturelles Orientierungstraining für die USA. Übungsmaterial zur Vorbereitung auf ein Studium in den Vereinigten Staaten. Saarbrücken: breitenbach.Google Scholar
  215. Müller-Jacquier, Bernd (in Druck). Linguistic Awareness of Cultures. Grundlagen eines Trainingsmoduls, In: J. Bolten (Hg.): Studien zur internationalen Unternehmenskommunikation. Leipzig: H. Popp.Google Scholar
  216. Mummendey, H. D. (1980). Methoden und Probleme der Kontrolle sozialer Erwünschtheit. Bielefelder Arbeiten zur Sozialpsychologie, Nr. 65. Universität Bielefeld.Google Scholar
  217. Neuberger, O. (1991). Personalentwicklung. Stuttgart: Enke.Google Scholar
  218. Noble, W. G. (1981). Gibsonian theory and the pragmatist perspective. Journal of Theory of Social Behaviour, 11 (1), 65–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  219. Nork, E. (1989). Management-Training: Evaluation, Probleme, Läsungansätze. Hochschulschriften zum Personalwesen. München: Hampp.Google Scholar
  220. Oberg, K. (1954). Culture shock. The Bobbs-Merrill Reprint Series, Np. A-329.Google Scholar
  221. Osgood, C. E., Suci, G. J. and Tannenbaum, P. H. (1957). The measurement of meaning. Urbana.Google Scholar
  222. Paige, R. M. and Martin, J. N. M. (1996). Ethics in intercultural training. In D. Landis and R. S. Bhagat (Hrsg.), Handbook of Intercultural Training, 35–60. Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  223. Palincsar, A. S. and Brown, A. L. (1984). Reciprocal teaching of comprehension-fostering and monitoring activities. Cognition and Instruction, 1 (2), 117–175.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  224. Paulson, F. L., Paulson, P. R. and Meyer, C. A. (1991). What makes a portfolio a port-folio? Educational Leadership, 48 (5), 60–63.Google Scholar
  225. Piaget, J. and Inhelder, B. (1971). Die Entwicklung des räumlichen Denkens beim Kinde. Stuttgart: Klett.Google Scholar
  226. Poortinga, Y. H., Vijver, F. J. R. van de, Joe, R. C. and Koppel, J. M. H. van de (1987). Peeling the onion called culture: A synopsis. In C.Kagitcibasi (Hrsg.), Growth and progress in cross-cultural psychology, 22–34. Amsterdam: Lisse.Google Scholar
  227. Frenzel, M., Eitel, F., Holzbach, R., Schoenheinz, R. J. and Schweiberer, L. (1993). Lernmotivation im studentischen Unterricht in der Chirurgie. Zeitschrift für Pädagogische Psychologie, 7 (2/3), 125–137.Google Scholar
  228. Pruegger, V. J. and Rogers, T. B. (1994). Cross-cultural sensitivity training: Methods and assessment. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 18 (3), 369387.Google Scholar
  229. Ptak, C. L., Cooper, J. and Brislin, R. (1995). Cross-cultural training programs: Advice and insights from experienced trainers. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 19 (3), 425–453.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  230. Rheinmann-Rothmeier, G. and Mandl, H. and Prenzel, M. (1993). Qualität in der Weiterbildung: Computerunterstützte problemorientierte Lernumgebungen. München/Berlin: Siemens.Google Scholar
  231. Reinmann-Rothmeier, G. and Mandl, H. (1998). Wissensmanagement: Eine Delphi-Studie. (Forschungsbericht Nr. 90 ). München Ludwigs-Maximilians-Universität, Lehrstuhl für Empirische Pädagogik und Pädagogische Psychologie.Google Scholar
  232. Renkl, A. (1996). Träges Wissen: Wenn Erlerntes nicht genutzt wird. Psychologische Rundschau, 47, 78–92.Google Scholar
  233. Renkl, A. (1998). Lernen durch Lehren. In D. H. Rost (Hrsg.), Handwörterbuch Pädagogische Psychologie, 305–308. Weinheim: Beltz.Google Scholar
  234. Renkl, A., Gruber, H. and Mandl, H. (1996). Situated learning in instructional settings: from euphoria to feasibility (Forschungsbericht Nr. 74 ). München: LudwigMaximilians-Universität, Institut für Pädagogische Psychologie und Empirische Pädagogik.Google Scholar
  235. Rogoff, B. (1990). Apprenticeship in thinking: Cognitive development in social context. New York: Oxford: University Press.Google Scholar
  236. Ross, L. (1977). The intuitive psychologist and his shortcomings: distortions in the attribution process. In L. Berkovitz (Hrsg.), Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 10, 173–220. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  237. Rossi, P. H., Freeman, H. E. and Hofmann, G. (1988). Programm-Evaluation: Einfüh-rung in die Methoden angewandter Sozialforschung. Stuttgart: Enke.Google Scholar
  238. Sachse, R. (1992). Zielorientierte Gesprächstherapie. Eine grundlegende Neukon-zeption. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  239. Salomon, G. and Perkins, D. (1989). The rocky roads to transfer: Rethinking mechanisms of a neglected phenomenon. Educational Psychologist, 24 (2), 113–142.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  240. Scardamalia, M., Bereiter, C. and Lamon, M. (1994). The CSILE project: trying to bring the classroom into world 3. In K. McGilly (Hrsg.), Classroom lessons: integrating cognitive theory and classroom practice, 201–228. Cambridge: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  241. Schachter, S. and Singer, J. E. (1962). Cognitive, social and physiological determinants of emotional state. Psychological Review, 69, 379–399.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  242. Schade, B. and Schüffel, W. (1996). Untersuchungen zu Belastungen und Streßreaktionen von Sanitätspersonal im humanitären Hilfseinsatz in Kambodscha. In G.-M. Meyer (Hrsg.), Friedensengel im Kampfanzug, 153–191. Opladen: Westdeutscher Verlag.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  243. Schmidt, S. J. (1994). Kognitive Autonomie und soziale Orientierung. Frankfurt a. M.: Suhrkamp.Google Scholar
  244. Schnotz, W. (1998). Conceptual change. In D. H. Rost (Hrsg.). Handwörterbuch Pädagogische Psychologie, 55–59. Weinheim: Beltz.Google Scholar
  245. Schofield, W. (1964). Psychotherapy, the purchase of friendship. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
  246. Schütze, F. (1976). Zur Hervorlockung und Analyse von Erzählungen thematisch relevanter Geschichten im Rahmen soziologischer Feldforschung-dargestellt an einem Projekt zur Erforschung von kommunalen Machtstrukturen. In Arbeitsgruppe Bielefelder Soziologen (Hrsg.), Kommunikative Sozialforschung, 159260. München: Fink.Google Scholar
  247. Schwartz, D. L. and Bransford, J. D. (1998). A time for telling. Cognition and Instruction, 16 (4), 475–522.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  248. Schwartz, D. L., Lin, X., Brophy, S. and Bransford, J. D. (im Druck a). Toward the development of flexibly adaptive instructional designs. In C. M. Reigeluth (Hrsg.), Instructional design and models, Vol II. Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  249. Schwartz, D. L., Brophy, S., Lin, X. and Bransford, J. D. (im Druck b). Flexibly adaptive instructional design: A case study from an educational psychology course. Educational Technology Research and Development.Google Scholar
  250. Schwemmer, O. (1984). Kultur. In J. Mittelstraß (Hrsg.), Enzyklopädie Philosophie und Wissenschaftstheorie, 2, 508–511. Mannheim: Bibliographisches Institut.Google Scholar
  251. Schönfeld, A. H. (1989). Teaching mathematical thinking and problem solving. In L. B. Resnick and L. E. Klopfer (Hrsg.), Toward the thinking curriculum: current cognitive research, 83–103. Alexandria: ASCD.Google Scholar
  252. Scriven, M. (1973). Goal free evaluation. In E. R. House (Hrsg.), School evaluation. Berkeley: Mc Cutchan.Google Scholar
  253. Segall, M. H. (1984). More than we need to know about culture, but we are afraid not to ask. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 15 (2), 153–162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  254. Segall, M. H., Dasen, P. R., Berry, J. W and Poortinga, Y. H. (1990). Human behavior in global perspective. An introduction to cross-cultural psychology. Needham Heights: Allyn and Bacon.Google Scholar
  255. Shirts, R. G. (1995). Beyond ethnocentrism: promoting cross-cultural understanding with Bafâ BaFâ. In S. M. Fowler and M. G. Mumford (Hrsg.), Intercultural Source-book: Cross-Cultural Training Methods, 93–100. Yarmouth: Intercultural Press.Google Scholar
  256. Shuell, T. J. and Moran, K. A. (1994). Learning theories: historical overview and trends. In T. Husén and T. Neville Postlethwaite (Hrsg.), The international enzyklopedia of education, 6, 3340–3345. Oxford: Pergamon.Google Scholar
  257. Shweder, R. A. (1991). Thinking through cultures: expeditions in cultural psychology. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  258. Sikkema, M. and Niyekawa, A. (1987). Design for cross-cultural learning. Yarmouth: Intercultural Press.Google Scholar
  259. Skinner, B. F. (1954). The science of learning and the art of teaching. Harvard Educational Review, 24, 86–97.Google Scholar
  260. Skinner, B. F. (1971). Erziehung als Verhaltensformung: Grundlagen einer Technologie des Lehrens. München-Neubiberg: Keimer.Google Scholar
  261. Snyder, M. (1974). Self-monitoring of expressive behavior. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 30, 526–537.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  262. Spiro, R. J., Feltovich, P. J., Coulson, R. L. and Anderson, D. K. (1989). Multiple analogies for complex concepts: Antidotes fro analogy-induced misconception in advanced knowledge acquisition. In S. Vosniadou and A. Ortony (Hrsg.), Similarity and analogical reasoning, 489–531. Cambridge: University Press.Google Scholar
  263. Spiro, R. J. and Jehng, J. C. (1990). Cognitive Flexibility and hypertext: Theory and technology for the nonlinear and multidimensional traversal of complex subject matter. In D. Nix and R. J. Spiro (Hrsg.), Cognition, education and multimedia: Exploring ideas in high technology, 163–205. Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  264. Stahl, G. K. (1995). Die Auswahl von Mitarbeitern für den Auslandseinsatz: Wissenschaftliche Grundlagen. In T. M. Kühlmann (Hrsg.), Mitarbeiterentsendung ins Ausland, 31–72. Göttingen: Verlag für Angewandte Psychologie.Google Scholar
  265. Stahl, G. K. (1998). Internationaler Einsatz von Führungskräften. München: Oldenbourg.Google Scholar
  266. Steins, G. and Wicklund, R. A. (1993). Zum Konzept der Perspektivenübernahme: Ein kritischer Überblick. Psychologische Rundschau, 44, 226–239.Google Scholar
  267. Steinwachs, B. (1995). Barnga: A game for all seasons. In S. M. Fowler and M. G. Mumford (Hrsg.), Intercultural Sourcebook: Cross-Cultural Training Methods, 101–108. Yarmouth: Intercultural Press.Google Scholar
  268. Stewart, E. C. (1995). Contrast-Culture Training. In S. M. Fowler and M. G. Mumford (Hrsg.), Intercultural Sourcebook: Cross-Cultural Training Methods, 47–57. Yarmouth: Intercultural Press.Google Scholar
  269. Stigler, J. W. and Perry, M. (1990). Mathematics learning in Japanese, Chinese, and American classrooms. In J. W. Stigler, R. A. Shweder and G. Herdt (Eds.), Cultural psychology, 328–353. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  270. Straub, J. (1999). Handlung, Interpretation, Kritik. Berlin: de Gruyter.Google Scholar
  271. Suchman, L. (1987). Plans and situated actions: the problem of human-machine communication. Cambridge: University Press.Google Scholar
  272. Suhr, M. (1994). John Dewey. Hamburg: Junius.Google Scholar
  273. Taylor, E. W. (1994). A learning model for becoming interculturally competent. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 18 (3), 389–408.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  274. Terhart, E. (1981). Intuition-Interpretation-Argumentation. Zum Problem der Geltungsbegründung von Interpretationen. Zeitschrift für Pädagogik, 27 (5), 769–793.Google Scholar
  275. Thierau, H., Stangel-Meseke, M. and Wottawa, H. (1992). Evaluation von Personalentwicklungsmaßnahmen. In K. Sonntag (Hrsg.), Personalentwicklung in Organisationen: Psychologische Grundlagen, Methoden und Strategien, 229–249. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  276. Thomas, A. (1993). Psychologie interkulturellen Lernens und Handelns. In ders. (Hrsg.), Kulturvergleichende Psychologie: Eine Einführung, 377–424. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  277. Thomas, A. (1995). Die Vorbereitung von Mitarbeitern für den Auslandseinsatz: Wissenschaftliche Grundlagen. In T. M. Kühlmann (Hrsg.), Mitarbeiterentsendung ins Ausland: Auswahl, Vorbereitung, Betreuung und Wiedereingliederung, 85–115. Göttingen: Verlag für Angewandte Psychologie.Google Scholar
  278. Thomas, A. (1996). Analyse der Handlungswirksamkeit von Kulturstandards. In ders. (Hrsg.), Psychologie interkulturellen Handelns, 107–135. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  279. Thomas, A. (1997). Psychologische Bedingungen und Wirkungen internationalen Managements —analysiert am Beispiel deutsch-chinesischer Zusammenarbeit. In J. Engelhard (Hrsg.), Interkulturelles Management. Theoretische Fundierung und funktionsspezifische Konzepte, 111–134. Wiesbaden: Gabler.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  280. Thomas, A., Kammhuber, S. and Layes, G. (1997). Interkulturelle Kompetenz: Ein Handbuch für internationale Einsätze der Bundeswehr. München: Verlag für Wehrwissenschaften.Google Scholar
  281. Thomas, A., Kammhuber, S. and Layes, G. (1997b). Expertenbefragung - durchgeführt im Rahmen des Forschungsprojektes „Psychologische Faktoren im Zusammenhang mit der Auswahl und der Ausbildung von Soldaten für internationale Einsätze. Unveröffentl. Material. Universität Regensburg: Institut für Psychologie.Google Scholar
  282. Thomas, A., Kinast, E.-U. and Schroll-Machl, S. (1999). Entwicklung interkultureller Handlungskompetenz von international tätigen Fach-und Führungskräften durch interkulturelle Trainings. In K. Götz (Hrsg.), Interkulturelles Lernen/ Inter-kulturelles Training, 97–122. München: Hampp.Google Scholar
  283. Thomas, A., Layes, G. and Kammhuber, S. (1998). Sensibilisierungs-und Orientierungstraining für die kulturallgemeine und die kulturspezifische Vorbereitung von Soldaten auf internationale Einsätze. München: Verlag für Wehrwissenschaft.Google Scholar
  284. Thomas, A. and Lulay, G. (1999). Evaluation interkultureller Trainings zur Vorbereitung von Bundeswehrsoldaten auf internationale Einsätze. Untersuchungen des Psychologischen Diensts der Bundeswehr, 34, 11–139.Google Scholar
  285. Thomas, A. and Schenk, E. (1996). Die Handlungswirksamkeit von Kulturstandards in der Interaktion zwischen Deutschen und Chinesen. Unveröff. Abschlußbericht zum Forschungsprojekt der VW-Stiftung, AZ 11/673621. Institut für Psychologie: Abteilung Sozialpsychologie. Universität Regensburg.Google Scholar
  286. Thorndike, E. L. and Woodworth, R. S. (1901). The influence of improvement in one mental function upon the efficiency of other functions. Psychological Review, 8, 247–261.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  287. Triandis, H. C. (Hrsg.) (1972). An analysis of subjective culture. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  288. Triandis, H. C. (1975). Culture training, cognitive complexity and interpersonal attitudes. In R. W. Brislin, S. Bochner and W. J. Lonner (Hrsg.), Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Learning, 39–77. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  289. Triandis, H. C. (1983). Essentials fo studying cultures. In D. Landis and R. W. Brislin (Hrsg.), Handbook of intercultural training (1. Aufl.), 82–117.Google Scholar
  290. Triandis, H. C. (1984). A theoretical framework for the more efficient construction of culture assimilators. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 8, 301–330.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  291. Triandis, H. C. (1995). Individualism and Collectivism. Boulder: Westview.Google Scholar
  292. Triandis, H. C. and Vassiliou, V. G. (1972). A comparative analysis of subjective cultu-re. In H. C. Triandis (Hrsg.). An analysis of subjective culture, 299–335. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  293. Trifonovitch, G. (1973). On cross-cultural orientation techniques. Topics in Culture Learning, 1, 38–47.Google Scholar
  294. Trompenaars, F. (1993). Handbuch globales managen: Wie man kulturelle Unterschiede im Geschäftsleben versteht. Düsseldorf: Econ.Google Scholar
  295. Varela, F. J. (1993). Kognitionswissenschaft - Kognitionstechnik. ( 3. Aufl.). Frankfurt a. M.: Suhrkamp.Google Scholar
  296. Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in society. The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  297. Vygotsky, L. S. (1981). The genesis of higher mental functions. In J. V. Wertsch (Hrsg.), The concept of activity in Soviet psychology, S. 144–188. Armonk: Sharpe.Google Scholar
  298. Wahl, D. (1979). Methodische Probleme bei der erfassung handlungsleitender und handlungsrechtfertigender subjektiver psychologischer Theorien von Lehrern. Zeitschrift für Entwicklungspsychologie und Pädagogische Psychologie, 9 (3), 208–217.Google Scholar
  299. Wahl, D. (1991). Handeln unter Druck: Der weite Weg vom Wissen zum Handeln bei Lehrern, Hochschullehrern und Erwachsenenbildern. Weinheim: Deutscher Studien Verlag.Google Scholar
  300. Wahren, H.K. (1996). Das lernende Unternehmen. Theorie und Praxis des organisationalen Lernens. Berlin: de Gruyter.Google Scholar
  301. Ward, C. and Kennedy, A. (1993). Where’s the culture in cross-cultural transitions? Journal of Cross-cultural Psychology, 24, 221–249.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  302. Weinert, F. E. (1996). Lerntheorien und Instruktionsmodelle. In F. Weinert (Hrsg.), Enzyklopädie der Psychologie, „Pädagogische Psychologie`, 2, 1–48. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  303. Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice: Learning, Meaning and Identity.Cambridge: University Press.Google Scholar
  304. Wertheimer, M. (1964). Produktives Denken. Frankfurt a. M.: Kramer.Google Scholar
  305. Wertsch, J. V. and Toma, C. (1994). Discourse and learning in the classroom. In L. P. Steffe and J. Gale (Hrsg.), Constructivism in education, S. 159–174. Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  306. Whitehead, A. N. (1929). The aims of education and other essays. New York: Mac Milian.Google Scholar
  307. Willke, H. (1995). Systemtheorie Ill: Steuerungstheorie. Stuttgart: Fischer..Google Scholar
  308. Winter, G. (1988). Konzepte und Stadien interkulturellen Lernens. In A.Thomas (Hrsg.), Interku/turelles Lernen im Schüleraustausch. SSIP-Bulletin, 58, 151–178. Saarbrücken: Breitenbach.Google Scholar
  309. Winter, G. (1994). Trainingskonzepte auf dem Prüfstand: Theoriebezug, Ethik, Evaluation. In: Interkulturelle Kommunikation und interkulturelles Training. Problemanalysen und Problemlösungen. Ergebnisse einer Arbeitstagung der evangelischen Akademie Bad Boll in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen. Stuttgart: Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen.Google Scholar
  310. Winter, G. (1994b). Was eigentlich ist eine kulturelle Überschneidungssituation? In A.Thomas (Hrsg.), Psychologie und multikulturelle Gesellschaft, 221–227. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  311. Winter, G. (1996). Reintegrationsproblematik: Vom Heimkehren in die Fremde und vom Wiedererlernten des Vertrauten. In A. Thomas (Hrsg.), Psychologie inter-kulturellen Handelns, 365–381. Göttingen: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  312. Wittgenstein, L. (1967). Philosophische Untersuchungen. Frankfurt a. M.: Suhrkamp.Google Scholar
  313. Wolpe, J. (1958). Psychotherapy by reciprocal inhibition. Stanford: University Press.Google Scholar
  314. Wottawa, H. and Thierau, H. (1990). Lehrbuch Evaluation. Bern: Huber.Google Scholar
  315. Yoshikawa, M. J. (1987). Cross-cultural adaptation and perceptual development. In Y. Y. Kim and W. B. Gudykunst (Hrsg.), Cross-cultural adaptation, 140–148. London: Sage.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2000

Authors and Affiliations

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations