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Theoretical Framework

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Abstract

The issue of “international market entry” has featured prominently in many publications in the area of management science. Within these publications the fundamental idea behind a market entry is treated relatively uniformly, i.e. the act of beginning activities in a market new to the entrant. Yet key subjects vary, and the width and depth to which the topics are discussed change too. In fact, each field of study focuses on the issues that are relevant to its specific research area, whereas few publications treat the topic as one broad issue and explain the phenomenon in all its aspects1.

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References

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© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 1999

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