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Vorurteile

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Zusammenfassung

Warum ist der Begriff „Vorurteil“ in unseren Köpfen so negativ behaftet? Dies liegt daran, dass Vorurteile neben positiven Effekten auf die Effizienz der Informationsverarbeitung auch verheerende Auswirkungen haben können und uns vor allem diese negative Seite der Medaille präsent ist. So können Vorurteile dazu führen, dass beispielsweise Ausländer, Behinderte oder auch Übergewichtige sowohl in der Schule als auch im Berufsleben gehänselt, drangsaliert und gemieden werden. Aufgrund dieser Auswirkungen von Vorurteilen und ihrer Eskalationen erscheint es besonders bedeutsam, Kenntnis darüber zu haben, was Vorurteile genau sind (Abschn. 4.1), wann und wie sie zur Anwendung kommen (Abschn. 4.2), wie sie entstehen (Abschn. 4.3) und was sie aufrechterhält (Abschn. 4.4). Auf Basis dieses Wissens ist es möglich, verantwortungsvoller mit eigenen Vorurteilen umzugehen.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Deutschland, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Fachgebiet Wirtschafts- und OrganisationspsychologieUniversität HohenheimStuttgartDeutschland
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of OsloOsloNorwegen
  3. 3.Zentrum für Soziales und Ökonomisches Verhalten (C-SEB)Universität zu KölnKölnDeutschland

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