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The Physical Properties of Reservoir Fluids

  • Xuetao HuEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Springer Mineralogy book series (MINERAL)

Abstract

Reservoir fluids refer to those fluids held in reservoir rocks under the conditions of high temperature and high pressure. Generally, reservoir fluids fall into three broad categories: (i) aqueous solutions with dissolved salts, (ii) liquid hydrocarbons, and (iii) gases (hydrocarbon and nonhydrocarbon). In all cases their compositions depend upon their source, history, and present thermodynamic conditions. Their distribution within a given reservoir depends upon the thermodynamic conditions of the reservoir as well as the petrophysical properties of the rocks and the physical and chemical properties of the fluids themselves.

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Copyright information

© Petroleum Industry Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Oil & Natural Gas EngineeringSouthwest Petroleum UniversityChengdu, SichuanChina

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